Printed from Afterschool Curriculum Choice - Math
Location: http://www.sedl.org/afterschool/guide/math/


Curriculum Details for
Everyday Math


Program
Description
Practitioner Expert
Review
Content Expert
Review
Everyday Math
Publication Date: 1988
Grade Level: K–6
Content Focus: Math
Costs: $240 for Classroom Resource Package (student materials sets, manipulatives, and a broad array of additional resources can be purchased separately)
The costs shown were accurate at the time of the review. Please check the publisher's web site for current prices.
Developer Contact Information
Wright Group/McGraw-Hill
130 East Randolph, Suite 400
Chicago, IL 60601
800-382-7670

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Program Description

Design Summary

Everyday Math is a school-based math curriculum that can be used afterschool, using worksheets, math drills, hands-on activities, and games for applying math skills and teaching concepts. Lessons can be differentiated to accommodate various learning levels. The teacher’s guide offers in-depth guidance on how to present material in different ways and individualize his or her approach.

Curriculum materials include a teacher lesson guide, math journals, student reference books, home connection handbook, posters, assessment materials, and other components.

Costs and Staff Training

Costs vary depending on what curriculum pieces are ordered. Classroom Resource Package costs $240 per grade. Student materials sets, manipulatives, and a broad array of additional resources can be purchased separately. More information is available at their website: www.wrightgroup.com. A certain amount of training is included with the cost of purchasing the materials. Consultants will be sent to the program site for training that can range from 1-3 days. Additional professional development opportunities are available for an extra cost.

Staff Qualifications

It is recommended that a trained classroom teacher implement Everyday Math. Practitioner expert review suggests that a background in math is not necessary, as the curriculum is specific enough that one can do an adequate job even without deep knowledge of the topic. Content expert reviews suggest that instructors need to be able to make decisions about student learning, and be ready to learn themselves.  The curriculum supports this by including embedded professional development to assist with this process.

Standards Alignment

  • National: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM)
  • State: Aligns with most state standards

Research Base

Everyday Mathematics is based on an extensive body of mathematics education research. This includes the authors’ own research into children’s mathematical thinking, as well as systematic studies of the mathematics education research literature for curriculum content and effective classroom practices.  The procedures used to create research-based programs should ensure that every lesson works in actual classrooms. Everyday Mathematics was created in a process of systematic field-testing and revision that lasted from 1986 to 1996.   The subsequent editions of Everyday Mathematics build on the tradition of research, teacher feedback, and student success. The authors continue to update the program as new studies and research on instructional methods become available.


Evaluation Details

Both independent and internal evaluations have been conducted, with positive results.

Overall Strengths/Overall Challenges

Strengths
  • Instructor could have little background in math and still adequately deliver material if follow curriculum exactly.
  • Covers breadth of material; sets strong foundation in math.
  • Addresses multiple learning styles with younger grades, comes at material from different angles.
  • Connects math to real world
  • Includes math routines, centers, games, projects, and family connections.
  • Activities and structure are promising practices in mathematics.
  • Lessons connect with other academic areas.
Challenges
  • Would be optimal if the school day classroom and afterschool program could coordinate when using this program.
  • Curriculum is not scripted, the flexibility could be problematic for instructors who are not comfortable making decisions to guide student learning.
  • May sacrifice classical learning, fundamentals such as memorization of times tables.
  • Does not teach abstract thinking, which students will need for higher math.

Practitioner Expert Review

Practitioner Expert Background

This practitioner has a bachelor of science in mathematics. He has taught afterschool math and literacy classes for several years in an urban middle school through Princeton Review.  He has taught a diverse student body, the majority of whom were African American and Latino, with a significant ELL population. He also works as a private tutor.

Logistics

Training
  • Would be useful to have curriculum modeled before teaching.
  • Important that instructors buy in to the curriculum. It uses a very different approach from the classical method of teaching math. Teachers who have taught math in a more traditional way for a long time may not want to start teaching a new way.
  • May take time to get to know new approach.
Set-up/preparation
  • More prep time needed for pre-K and kindergarten curricula since there are more manipulatives and activities.
  • For older students, prep time could consist just of reading over lesson.
  • Lots of materials, it would take time to decide what to use.
  • As long as teacher can manage behavioral issues, can do with larger group (although ideally no more than 20). Includes work in small groups and pairs.
  • Little technology required. CD component can be purchased, but is not necessary. Music player helpful for many of the activities.

Student Engagement

  • More engaging activities for younger kids, can bring music into the lessons. For upper elementary students, lessons are more about content, with fewer activities.
  • New, more intuitive methods of doing math may be fun and motivating for kids.
  • The instruction is engaging and fast-paced. 
  • The curriculum consistently reinforces various topics in a variety of different ways.
  • Stresses interconnectedness and overlap between different areas of math.
  • Uses real-world applications of math, establishing routines to help students see math in many different contexts. For example, students can study daily attendance as a representation of math.
  • Includes materials to bring home and activities to do with families (although parents/guardians may be wary of the new methods of teaching math, that are probably quite different from what they learned in school).

Content

Adaptability to instructor needs
  • Teacher friendly and well organized.
  • Notes which activities are core and which are supplemental. This allows instructor to decide which activities/lessons to include, can pick and choose while still covering essential content.
  • Includes calendar laying out different strands. Gives top-down view of you need to cover.
  • Can choose to follow curriculum exactly if instructor feels uncomfortable making own decisions, or can just make use of exercises, activities, and strategies if instructor is experienced teacher.
General skills taught
  • Covers a wide range of math skills.
  • Emphasizes interconnectedness and pattern recognition. Teaches how to organize information in representations.
  • Sets a strong foundation, teaching skills that older kids often struggle with (such as pattern recognition).
  • Curriculum is rooted in connecting math to the real world. It does not, however, teach students how to think abstractly, which students will eventually have to learn to do to be successful in higher levels of math.
Addressing diverse student needs
  • Includes manipulatives, music, painting, connections to art. Uses many different strategies to engage different types of learners, especially in the younger grades.
  • Many group and pair activities
  • Deliberate efforts to reach out to ELL students, sprinkled throughout (i.e. notes to write vocabulary in “Math Word Bank”)
  • Includes suggestions for differentiation for different skill levels.
  • Includes “Informing Instruction” notes that anticipate and recognize common errors and misconceptions in children’s thinking or alert teacher to multiple solution strategies or unique insights children may offer.
  • Could be difficult with students with behavioral issues if teacher does not have strong behavior management skills.
  • Avoids cultural biases.

Strengths and Challenges

Strengths
  • Instructor could have little background in math and still adequately deliver material if he or she follow curriculum.
  • Covers breadth of material; sets strong foundation in math.
  • Addresses multiple learning styles with younger grades, comes at material from different angles.
  • Connects math to real world.
Challenges
  • May sacrifice classical learning and fundamentals such as memorization of times tables.
  • Does not teach abstract thinking, which students will need for higher math.

Content Expert Review

Content Expert Reviewer

Maggie Myers
Dr. Maggie Myers is a lecturer at The University of Texas and a mathematics education consultant. As a mathematics content specialist with the SEDL National Center for Quality Afterschool, she observes promising afterschool programs to identify effective practices, guides materials development for disseminating research-based supports, and conducts training. Maggie has a Ph.D. in Mathematical Statistics and extensive experiences in mathematics education, from developing educational materials for young children and their families to teaching high school through graduate-level mathematics. She was the site director for Family Math in Austin, Texas, a math coach, and the creator of materials for informal settings as well as materials for the implementation of the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Mathematics, the curriculum for the state of Texas. Recently, she led a writing team for revising the grades 3-5 Washington State Mathematics Standards.

Content

  • Everyday Mathematics is a comprehensive mathematics program that is designed for day school programs.
  • The content is accurate and is designed and validated by research.

Skills

Academic Skills
  • Algebra and uses of variables
  • Data and chance
  • Geometry and spatial sense
  • Measures and measurement
  • Numeration and order
  • Patterns, functions, and sequences
  • Operations
  • Reference frames
Study Skills
  • These are not explicitly addressed by the curriculum.
Non-Academic Skills
  • Taking turns, working together cooperatively.
  • Communicating ideas to solve problems.

Alignment to Standards

  • The curriculum covers all of the mathematics content and process strands described in the National Council for Teachers of Mathematics Principles and Standards for School Mathematics.
  • The standards likely provide good coverage of expectations for any given state, and are grade level specific.

Assessment

  • Assessment handbook with Blackline Masters are used to track individual progress.
  • Students are continually assessed with competitions, games, worksheets, portfolios, as well as periodic and standardized tests.
  • Suggestions for how to recognize student achievement are also included.

Structure

  • This curriculum is structured but flexible with many options and choices based on students needs and interests.
  • Instructors are provided many options and given direction to help them choose between the options.
  • Topics are entirely defined by the curriculum, but many activity options are given and instructors have a good deal of flexibility in which activities they choose to use.
  • The curriculum is a balance of teacher-directed instruction with opportunities for open-ended, hands-on explorations, long-term projects, and on-going practice.
  • Some activities could be considered student-directed because there are teacher choices based on student responses, as well as choices made entirely by students.

Addressing Diverse Student Needs

Adaptability
  • The curriculum gives suggestions for adjusting activities and differentiated instruction.
  • There are supports for English language learners, readiness, connections, enrichment, extra practice, creating learning centers, and using technology.
Developmental level
  • Addresses elementary school mathematics at each specific grade level.  It clearly tailors to the developmental needs of each individual student.
  • Activities are all developmentally appropriate.
Learning Styles Addressed
  • The curriculum consists of a variety of activities that may appeal to different learning styles.
  • Movement/spatial learning: Some activities address this. For example, kindergarteners may act out counting down to zero.
  • Interpersonal learning: Students often work in large and small groups, and can be assigned suggested “jobs.”
  • Artistic learning: The curriculum addresses this by connecting math with art and music and encouraging creativity. For example, students may sing number songs, or explore patterns through art projects.
Multiculturalism
  • The curriculum consists of a variety of activity choices.
  • Research suggests that it has been successful in reducing achievement gaps.
  • Beyond this, the curriculum does little to explicitly address students’ diverse backgrounds.

Strengths and Challenges

Strongest Features
  • The curriculum describes math routines, centers, games, projects, and family connections.
  • Activities and structure are promising practices in mathematics.
  • Lessons connect with other academic areas.
Challenges and Drawbacks
  • It would be optimal if the school day classroom and afterschool program could coordinate when using this program.
  • Curriculum is not scripted, the flexibility could be problematic for instructors who are not comfortable making decisions to guide student learning.

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