Send an Annotation from the Connection Collection by E-mail

This page opened in a new window. Use the form below to send this citation by e-mail or close this window if you wish to return to the Connections Collection.

Send Citation and Annotation by E-mail

Citation:Sharif, I., Ozuah, P., Dinkevich, E., Mulvihill, M. (2003). Impact of a brief literacy intervention on urban preschoolers. Early Childhood Education Journal, 30(3), 177-180.

Annotation:
The purpose of this study is to explore the impact of a parental literacy intervention consisting of four one-hour weekly workshops on the vocabulary skills of preschool children. The study expected children whose parents had received the intervention and children whose mothers lacked college education to benefit more from the interventions than would those who did not attend and those with college education. While both groups had comparable receptive vocabulary scores at baseline, results indicated a significant increase in scores for participants as compared with 11 children of parents who did not attend the workshop. In addition, results showed a significant difference between scores of children whose mothers had attended college and those who did not. Students were not randomly assigned to comparison or treatment groups, but findings suggest that a home reading component is necessary to show improvement in childrenÕs reading skills following a school reading intervention. Researchers used a pre-post case series design at a child-care center in the poorest district in the US. Data were collected using a survey of 49 African American and Hispanic families in South Bronx, New York, as well as a test of receptive vocabulary of preschool children. One form of the test was administered before the workshop and the alternate form was administered for follow-up. The study can be useful in understanding the impact of parent-focused literacy interventions on the development of early literacy skills. Because the sample was drawn from one school district, findings may not be universally applicable.

The Connection Collection: ©SEDL 2017