Send an Annotation from the Connection Collection by E-mail

This page opened in a new window. Use the form below to send this citation by e-mail or close this window if you wish to return to the Connections Collection.

Send Citation and Annotation by E-mail

Citation:Deslandes, R., & Bertrand, R. (2005). Motivation of parent involvement in secondary-level schooling. Journal of Educational Research, 98(3), 164-175.

Annotation:
The purpose of this study is to examine how Hoover-Dempsey and Sandler's (1995, 1997) four psychological constructs of parent involvement-parents' role construction, self-efficacy, perceived teacher invitations, and perceived student invitations-predict parent involvement in their adolescents' schooling. Survey results indicated that parents of seventh graders were most likely to be involved at home when they perceived a student invitation in an academic domain, such as being asked to read something that their adolescent had written, and involved at school when parents felt it was part of their parenting responsibilities, when they perceived a teacher invitation, and when they perceived a student invitation. Parents of eighth graders were most likely to be involved in school work at home when they perceived a student invitation in an academic or social domain, such as talking about current events, and when parents felt confident that they could help the student, and involved at school when they perceived a teacher invitation to be involved and when they perceived student invitation in a social domain. Furthermore, results indicated that parents of ninth grade students were most likely to be involved at home when they perceived a student request in an academic domain, and involved at school when parents felt it was part of their parenting responsibilities. The participants in this study were 770 parents of secondary-level students in grades seven through nine who were enrolled in five public schools in both rural and urban areas. The demographics of the sample were representative of the general population of Quebec. The majority of survey respondents were mothers who worked outside of the home. This study suggests that different strategies to encourage parental involvement should be undertaken depending upon the ultimate goal of increased involvement at home or at school. Future research, including randomized controlled trials, might explore the effectiveness of specific interventions in motivating parent involvement at the secondary level.

The Connection Collection: ©SEDL 2017