ADVANCING RESEARCH, IMPROVING EDUCATION cart
National Partnership for Quality Afterschool Learning
A Resource Guide for Planning and Operating Afterschool Programs
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Title Index

The Resource Guide contains 171 resources, listed below alphabetically by title.

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"It's Being Done": Academic Success in Unexpected Schools
Karin Chenoweth
This resource discusses 15 public schools that demonstrate that all children can learn. A common thread running through each school is the "relentless focus on instruction"—what needs to be taught and how teachers will teach it. The book provides case studies on each school with strategies that educators will find useful. (250 pages)
© 2007
Print$26.95
Harvard Education Publishing Group
8 Story St., 1st Floor
Cambridge, MA 02138
Phone: 888-437-1437
Fax: 978-348-1233
Web: http://www.hepg.org

10 Tips for Affirming Diversity and Supporting Equity in New After School Programs (New)
California Tomorrow
This resource provides key suggestions for building afterschool programs that will provide the skills young people need to thrive in a diverse, multicultural community. The 10 tips address issues such as establishing a commitment to equity and inclusion; hiring staff that reflect the community and that understand diversity issues; developing inclusive outreach and application materials; and establishing a board or advisory committee whose membership reflects the communities served. (2 pages)
© 2007
Web Resourcehttp://www.californiatomorrow.org/media/astips.pdf
California Tomorrow
1904 Franklin St., Ste. 300
Oakland, CA 94612
Phone: 510-496-0220
Fax: 510-496-0225
E-mail: ct411@californiatomorrow.org
Web: http://www.californiatomorrow.org

100 Ways to Motivate Others: How Great Leaders Can Produce Insane Results Without Driving People Crazy (New)
Steve Chandler and Scott Richardson
Chandler and Richardson offer practical motivational advice relevant to everyday circumstances. This resource gives the reader common-sense tips, inspiring and relevant quotes, and invaluable anecdotes. The authors group fundamental and inspirational ideas in brief packages. Because many programs run as a team, the authors frequently use sports analogies to illustrate the particular motivational method. 100 Ways to Motivate Others is a crucial, accessible, insightful guide for afterschool program directors and managers who seek advice on hiring the right people, delegating appropriate roles, time management, communication, change, and positive leadership. (224 pages)
© 2005
Print$19.99
The Career Press, Inc.
3 Tice Rd.
P.O. Box 687
Franklin Lakes, NJ 07417
Phone: 800-227-3371
Web: http://www.careerpress.com

101 Life Skills Games for Children (New)
Bernie Badegruber
Games are not only fun for kids, but they teach practical life skills as well. The 101 games promote tolerance, communication, responsibility, cooperation, self-confidence, and respect. They are arranged in four sections according to the skills they address: "I Games," "You Games," "We Games," and "Adding More Imagination." Each game has goals, such as developing self-image, being considerate, or building group spirit. Step-by-step instructions and ideas are also provided, as well as ideas for reflection and discussion. This book is an excellent resource on how to teach kids ages 6–12 social and emotional skills through engaging games. (176 pages)
© 2006
Print$14.95
Hunter House, Inc.
P.O. Box 2914
Alameda, CA 94501-0914
Phone: 510-865-5282
Fax: 510-865-4295
Web: http://www.hunterhouse.com

101 More Life Skills Games for Children (New)
Bernie Badegruber
A companion book to 101 Life Skills Games for Children, this book offers 101 creative games to play with kids ages 9–15. These games will not only provide exciting experiences, but they will also teach important skills such as patience, earning respect, and developing self-confidence. Pre-teens and teens can deal with conflicts or problems they are having through games and activities that prepare them for similar situations they may encounter in the future. Each game is designed around a life skill goal and includes questions and ideas for role play to extend the activity into a time of discussion and reflection. Brief instructions and the use of simple props make these games and activities easy to implement. (162 pages)
© 2006
Print$14.95
Hunter House, Inc.
P.O. Box 2914
Alameda, CA 94501-0914
Phone: 510-865-5282
Fax: 510-865-4295
Web: http://www.hunterhouse.com

151 Quick Ideas to Inspire Your Staff (New)
Jerry R. Wilson
Unfortunately, some afterschool programs suffer from high turnover rates, inconsistent training, time constraints, and ineffective employee motivation. This resource overflows with brilliant, succinct ideas on motivating and inspiring staff members. Instead of lengthy chapters, the text consists of 151 great, practical ideas with brief anecdotes and lessons that any afterschool director may employ to effect higher morale and a more productive program. (208 pages)
© 2005
Print$12.99
The Career Press, Inc.
3 Tice Rd.
P.O. Box 687
Franklin Lakes, NJ 07417
Phone: 800-227-3371
Web: http://www.careerpress.com

9 Things a Leader Must Do: Breaking Through to the Next Level (New)
Henry Cloud
Leadership can be a life of frustrating challenges without a solid foundation in the psychology behind successful leadership. This resource outlines simply yet thoroughly how leaders (and potential leaders) may reach their personal and career goals while establishing a positive influence on those around them. According to the author, it is the overall pattern of thinking and innate ambition—rather than charm, money, or education—that creates leaders. The text presents ways to maintain positive thinking and behavior, move forward, take small but productive steps, and lead honestly. (129 pages)
© 2006
Print$12.99
Thomas Nelson, Inc.
P.O. Box 141000
Nashville, TN 37214
Phone: 800-251-4000
Web: http://www.thomasnelson.com

A Framework for Understanding and Working With Students and Adults From Poverty (Revised)
Ruby K. Payne
This best-selling book explains the differences between situational and generational poverty, describes poignant scenarios, and identifies resources that can be used to help the individuals in the scenarios. The author helps readers understand the language used by those living in poverty, the shared characteristics of poverty, and the actions that are a result of those characteristics. She also stresses the importance of role models and support systems. (199 pages)
© 2005
Print$22.00
Aha! Process, Inc.
P.O. Box 727
Highlands, TX 77562
Phone: 800-424-9484
Fax: 281-426-5600
Web: http://www.ahaprocess.com

A Guide to Successful Public-Private Partnerships for Youth Programs (New)
Nanette Relave and Sharon Deich
This guide is for policymakers and program and community leaders interested in supporting youth initiatives. It defines public-private partnerships and explores why they are created and what they can do. The guide also examines effective strategies for establishing and sustaining partnerships based on successful national, state, and local models.
© 2007
Print$20.00
Web Resourcehttp://76.12.61.196/publications/publicPrivate_PM.pdf
The Finance Project
1401 New York Ave. NW, Ste. 800
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-628-4200
Fax: 202-628-1293
E-mail: info@financeproject.org
Web: http://www.financeproject.org

A How-To Guide for Summer Food Sponsors on Purchasing High-Quality Summer Meals (New)
Srinidhi Vijaykumar and Crystal Fitzsimons
This resource is for those engaged in the Summer Food Service Program. A How-to Guide will assist in improving meal quality by providing information on strengthening contract language, improving vendor communication, and increasing competition on bids. (22 pages)
© 2007
Web Resourcehttp://www.frac.org/pdf/summermeals2007.pdf
Food Research and Action Center
1875 Connecticut Ave. NW, Ste. 540
Washington, DC 20009
Phone: 202-986-2200
Fax: 202-986-2525
Web: http://www.frac.org

A New Day for Learning (New)
Time, Learning, and Afterschool Task Force
This report calls for a dramatic shift in the way a school day is structured. It argues that afterschool enrichment programs that include both academic and recreational components are crucial to student success. The report's review of research and emerging strategies leads to the concept of a new learning system that includes a redefinition of student success; the use of knowledge about how students learn best throughout the day; and the integration of various approaches to acquiring and reinforcing knowledge. This resource also proposes intentional collaboration across local, state, and national sectors. (43 pages)
© 2007
Web Resourcehttp://www.edutopia.org/pdfs/ANewDayforLearning.pdf
The George Lucas Educational Foundation
P.O. Box 3494
San Rafael, CA 94912
Phone: 415-662-1600
Fax: 415-662-1532
Web: http://www.edutopia.org

A New Wave of Evidence: The Impact of School, Family, and Community Connections on Student Achievement
Anne T. Henderson and Karen L. Mapp
In producing this synthesis, the authors examined more than 50 research studies. A New Wave of Evidence presents evidence showing that schools must connect parent activities to student learning goals while being aware and respectful of differences among families. Specifically, schools need to build trust and collaborative relationships among teachers, families, and community leaders to address families' needs as well as their differences and to adhere to a philosophy of shared power and responsibility. (244 pages)
© 2002
Print$14.00
Web Resourcehttp://www.sedl.org/pubs/catalog/items/fam33.html
SEDL
4700 Mueller Blvd.
Austin, TX 78723
Phone: 800-476-6861
Fax: 512-476-2286
Web: http://www.sedl.org

A Review of Research on the Integration of Sports and Physical Activity Into Out-of-School Time Programs (New)
Policy Studies Associates, Inc.
This review of the research on sports and physical activity in out-of-school-time programs is broken into five sections. The first section covers what has been learned from youth development research and out-of-school programming about promoting healthy development. The second section looks at factors and conditions that influence youth participation in sports and physical activity. The third section shows what outcomes are associated with participation in sports and physical activity. The fourth section examines the characteristics of effective outof- school sports and physical activity programs. The last section discusses policy and practice implications. (22 pages)
© 2006
Web Resourcehttp://www.policystudies.com/studies/youth/OSTsports.pdf
Policy Studies Associates, Inc.
1718 Connecticut Ave. NW, Ste. 400
Washington, DC 20009
Phone: 202-939-9780
Fax: 202-939-5732
Web: http://www.policystudies.com

Achieving Leadership Genius (New)
Drea Zigarmi, Susan Fowler, and Dick Lyles
Using the idea that different situations require unique leadership techniques and skills, the authors of this book present a new approach to leadership based on five contexts. This framework is designed to help leaders improve their abilities to lead in multiple situations. The leadership contexts are blended with leadership practices throughout the chapters to provide information that can be applied to particular settings. Understanding these contexts is important because who you are leading and where you are leading will greatly determine how you will lead. The authors provide organized, systematic techniques to help readers become leaders who recognize the setting in which they are leading, adapt to a wide variety of situations, and are ready to handle any issues that inevitably arise. (315 pages)
© 2007
Print$25.99
FT Press
1 Lake St.
Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
Phone: 800-382-3419
Web: http://www.ftpress.com

Active Hours Afterschool: Childhood Obesity & the Role of Afterschool Programs as a Solution (New)
Afterschool Alliance
Obesity has been acknowledged as a growing concern in almost every part of the country. This document discusses how afterschool programs are ideally positioned to help curb this problem among school-age children and what can be done. (15 pages)
No Date
Web Resourcehttp://www.statewideafterschoolnetworks.net/active-hours-afterschool-childhood-obesity-and-role-afterschool-programs-solution
Afterschool Alliance
1616 H St. NW, Ste. 820
Washington, DC 20006
Phone: 202-347-2030
Fax: 202-347-2092
Web: http://www.afterschoolalliance.org

Active Hours Afterschool: Local Wellness Policy Toolkit for Afterschool Programs (New)
Afterschool Alliance
The Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act of 2004 required every school district to develop a local wellness policy by the end of the 2006–2007 school year. This document discusses the minimum standards of such a policy and advocacy possibilities that afterschool programs can help influence. (6 pages)
© 2006
Web Resourcehttp://www.afterschoolalliance.org/policyActiveHoursObesity.cfm
Afterschool Alliance
1616 H St. NW, Ste. 820
Washington, DC 20006
Phone: 202-347-2030
Fax: 202-347-2092
Web: http://www.afterschoolalliance.org

Active Listening (New)
Michael H. Hoppe
Active Listening helps leaders and managers improve their listening ability. This compact resource teaches many concepts helpful to principals, teachers, staff, and parents. The author suggests that, through listening, managers and leaders may more effectively arbitrate situations, handle problems, and detect miscommunications before tensions erupt. He discusses the importance of unbiased, objective listening and explains how active (rather than passive) listening fosters a sense of trust and respect. In addition, he shows step-by-step how to overcome challenges through listening. (32 pages)
© 2006
Print$9.95
Center for Creative Leadership
P.O. Box 26300
Greensboro, NC 27438-6300
Phone: 336-288-7210
Web: http://www.ccl.org/leadership/Publications/index.aspx

After School Guide: Nourish Their Bodies, Feed Their Minds (New)
Food Research and Action Center
This document discusses why children need afterschool programs and why nutrition is crucial to afterschool success. It also provides insight into which federal child nutrition programs are available, what health and safety requirements apply, how to participate in such programs as the national school lunch program, and how to provide nutrition education. An appendix listing state child nutrition agencies is included. (33 pages)
No Date
Web Resourcehttp://www.frac.org/Afterschool_Guide.pdf
Food Research and Action Center (FRAC)
1875 Connecticut Ave. NW, Ste. 540
Washington, DC 20009
Phone: 202-986-2200
Fax: 202-986-2525
Web: http://www.frac.org

Afterschool Action Kit
Afterschool Alliance
This kit explains what afterschool programs can and should do for young people and how to locate or start one. This resource is intended to promote afterschool programs within the community. The kit is also available in Spanish. (20 pages)
No Date
Web Resourcehttp://www.afterschoolalliance.org/publications.cfm
Afterschool Alliance
1616 H St. NW, Ste. 820
Washington, DC 20006
Phone: 202-347-1002
Web: http://www.afterschoolalliance.org

Afterschool Advantage: Powerful New Learning Opportunities (New)
Terry K. Peterson and Sybil Fix, Editors
Authored by leaders in the field of afterschool, this book provides a multidisciplinary view of afterschool programming. Topics include science in afterschool, technology, the power of arts, entrepreneurial advantage, afterschool for the global age, and creating pathways to college. Afterschool administrators and teachers can use these ideas to start or enhance their own programs. (80 pages)
© 2007
Web Resourcehttp://www.afterschooled.org/articles/Afterschool_Advantage.pdf
Foundations, Inc.
Moorestown West Corporate Center
2 Executive Dr., Ste. 1
Moorestown, NJ 08057
Phone: 888-977-5437
Fax: 856-533-1601
E-mail: info@foundationsinc.org
Web: http://www.foundationsinc.org

Afterschool for the Global Age (New)
The Asia Society and the George Lucas Educational Foundation
This report summarizes and expands on a national meeting that explored ways to prepare young people for employment and citizenship in the global age through afterschool programming. Participants shared knowledge of best practices and model programs and recommended next steps for the field. The report includes topics on developing an educational response to globalization, designing new approaches to global literacy after school, integrating an international perspective into policy and advocacy, and creating and building on successes. (24 pages)
© 2007
Print$11.00
Web Resourcehttp://www.internationaled.org/afterschoolreport.pdf
The Asia Society
725 Park Ave.
New York, NY 10021
Phone: 212-327-9227
Web: http://www.askasia.org

Afterschool Initiative: Evaluation (New)
Sabrina Arrendondo Mattson
This resource presents the program evaluation findings of the Colorado Trust's 5-year, $11-million afterschool initiative. This initiative began in 2000, provided support to more than 30 afterschool providers in Colorado, and served more than 12,000 students in grades 4–9. The National Research Center conducted the independent program evaluation and found that the participating youth reported improvements in their positive life choices, sense of self, core values, cultural competency, life skills, community involvement, and academic success. Chapters on the program evaluation methodology, results, conclusions, and recommendations are included. (48 pages)
© 2005
Web Resourcehttp://www.coloradotrust.org/repository/publications/pdfs/ASI/ASI-EvalAssessmentreport9-05.pdf
The Colorado Trust
1600 Sherman St.
Denver, CO 80203
Phone: 888-847-9140
Fax: 303-839-9034
E-mail: receptionist@coloradotrust.org
Web: http://www.coloradotrust.org

Afterschool Matters (New)
Sara L. Hill
A successful afterschool program—or any educational endeavor—balances academic learning with fun and enriching activities. Afterschool Matters addresses developmental stages, types of support for academically challenged children, and useful models developed by experts. Selected projects relate to various student interests and complement classroom learning while providing much-needed social interaction and artistic expression. (109 pages)
© 2008
Print$25.95
Corwin Press
2455 Teller Rd.
Thousand Oaks, CA 91320
Phone: 800-233-9936
Fax: 800-417-2466
Web: http://www.corwinpress.com

Afterschool Style in Practice: 25 Skill-Building Meetings for Staff (New)
Center for Afterschool and Community Education
These 45-minute staff development modules are specifically designed for the unique challenges facing afterschool professionals. The content is based on trainings conducted with thousands of afterschool providers in diverse settings. The sessions offer flexibility in scheduling with the last chapter providing a template for customizing the session to meet your program's needs. (182 pages)
© 2007
Print$59.95
Center for Afterschool and Community Education
2 Executive Dr., Ste. 1
Moorestown, NJ 08057
Phone: 856-533-2702
Fax: 856-533-2701
Web: http://www.afterschooled.org

America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being 2007
Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics
The Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics seeks to improve consistency in data collection and reporting on children and their families. This volume of America's Children presents a summary of 38 national indicators of important aspects of children's lives and the changes in these indicators from the previous year. The report has been restructured into seven sections: family and social environment, economic circumstances, health care, physical environment and safety, behavior, education, and health. Information such as the percentage of children that visit the dentist, the demographics of the child population, and the percentage of children with elevated blood-lead levels can be found in this report. (187 pages)
© 2007
Web Resourcehttp://www.childstats.gov/pdf/ac2007/ac_07.pdf
Health Resources and Services Administration Information Center
P.O. Box 2910
Merrifield, VA 22116
Phone: 888-275-4772
Fax: 703-821-2098
E-mail: ask@hrsa.org
Web: http://www.childstats.gov

Analyzing Qualitative Data
Ellen Taylor-Powell and Marcus Renner
This guide explores the many ways of examining narrative data, which is often referred to as content analysis. It describes the analysis process, which includes the following steps: getting to know the data, focusing on the analysis, categorizing the information, identifying patterns, and interpreting the data. The guide also discusses the pitfalls of the analysis process. (10 pages)
© 2002
Print$1.25
Web Resourcehttp://www.uwex.edu/ces/pdande/evaluation/evaldocs.html
Cooperative Extension Publications
University of Wisconsin
45 N. Charter St.
Madison, WI 53715
Phone: 877-947-7827

Analyzing Quantitative Data
Ellen Taylor-Powell
This resource discusses various types of descriptive statistics that can be used to make evaluation data more understandable. These statistics include numerical counts or frequencies, percentages, measures of central tendency (mean, mode, and median), and measures of variability (range, standard deviation, and variance). The guide offers specific examples of each of these descriptive statistics and explains how to calculate them. It also shows how to rank and work with the data to allow evaluators to explore their findings further. (11 pages)
© 1996
Print$2.00
Web Resourcehttp://www.uwex.edu/ces/pdande/evaluation/evaldocs.html
Cooperative Extension Publications
University of Wisconsin
45 N. Charter St.
Madison, WI 53715
Phone: 877-947-7827

Best Practices Workbook: Guidelines for School-Age Programs (New)
Michael S. Ashcraft
This workbook is a companion to the book Best Practices: Guidelines for School-Age Programs. It is based on research and contains a set of checklists for best practices and practical guidelines to help facilitate the positive development of children. By allowing you to identify strengths, weaknesses, and methods for improvement, this resource can be a great tool for self-assessment and growth. Specific best practices on a variety of topics concerning school-age programs, such as relationships, diversity, environment, equipment and materials, staff qualifications, and behavior management, are included. (72 pages)
© 2007
Print$16.00
Sparrow Media Group
16588 Fieldcrest Ave.
Farmington, MN 55024
Phone: 952-953-9166
Fax: 952-431-3461
E-mail: info@sparrowmediagroup.com
Web: http://www.sparrowmediagroup.com

Best Practices: Guidelines for School-Age Programs (New)
Michael S. Ashcraft
Many children spend up to 35 hours a week in school-age care. The quality of these programs can have an enormous impact on their education and development. It is important for their experiences to be positive and beneficial. Bringing together research on the brain, child development, and the theories of school-age child development, this book provides descriptions of specific best practices for school-age programs. Case studies are used to provide real-life examples of ideas and practices. This information will help you design an afterschool program that promotes positive development of children or improve one already in existence. (140 pages)
© 2007
Print$16.00
Sparrow Media Group
16588 Fieldcrest Ave.
Farmington, MN 55024
Phone: 952-953-9166
Fax: 952-431-3461
E-mail: info@sparrowmediagroup.com
Web: http://www.sparrowmediagroup.com

Beyond the Bake Sale: The Essential Guide to Family-School Partnerships (New)
Anne T. Henderson, Karen L. Mapp, Vivian R. Johnson, and Don Davies
Written for parents, teachers, administrators, and policymakers, Beyond the Bake Sale describes how to form essential relationships for encouraging student success. In the introduction the authors state, "Partnerships among schools, families, and community groups are not a luxury—they are a necessity." This timely resource provides useful tools, checklists, sample surveys, and school policies for promoting community and family involvement in the educational process. Topics include involving parents to help test scores; dealing with issues of race, class, and culture; and supporting advocacy. (338 pages)
© 2007
Print$25.00
The New Press
38 Greene St.
New York, NY 10013
Web: http://www.thenewpress.com

Beyond the Bell: A Toolkit for Creating Effective Afterschool Programs, Third Edition (Revised)
Judith G. Caplan, Carol K. McElvain, and Katie E. Walter
Beyond the Bell will assist afterschool program staff in the following areas: management; collaboration and community building; programming; linkages with the school day; evaluation; communication; parent and family involvement; and staff development. The toolkit offers criteria for decision making and suggests effective strategies. Tools help with gathering data, creating formats for analyzing information, structuring dialogue around important issues, and assisting in information sharing. The third edition includes 82 tools for implementing a successful afterschool program. The toolkit includes a CD-ROM, five staff workbooks, and access to the accompanying Web site. (235 pages)
© 2005
Print$79.00
Learning Points Associates
1120 E. Diehl Rd., Ste. 200
Naperville, IL 60563
Phone: 800-356-2735
Fax: 630-649-6700
Web: http://www.learningpt.org

Breakthrough Thinking: Brainstorming for Inspiration and Ideas (New)
Nick Souter
According to the author, everyone has potential to brainstorm productively and fluidly. Souter helps make that inspiration happen in this graphically striking book. Each lesson includes lessons, tests, puzzles, and visual riddles that stimulate ideas and encourage breakthrough ideas. Part of the Creative Business Solutions series, this resource showcases Souter's graphics and creative, insightful analogies that help individuals overcome destructive work habits and reach their inner artist. Learn how to inspire others and maintain a "creative compass" in any atmosphere. A CD-ROM, which presents animated and interactive exercises related to those presented in the text, accompanies the book. (144 pages)
© 2007
Print and CD-ROM$17.95
Sterling Publishing Co., Inc.
387 Park Ave. S
New York, NY 10016
Phone: 800-805-5489
Web: http://www.sterlingpublishing.com

Building Powerful Community Organizations: A Personal Guide to Creating Groups That Can Solve Problems and Change the World (New)
Michael Jacoby Brown
This book is an all-inclusive step-by-step guide to starting or strengthening a community organization. It is meant for the volunteer as well as the paid employee—anyone who wants to strengthen or start an organization for community benefit. The book explains community organizing and presents a how-to guide for building an organization that includes such information as how to develop a mission, goals, and objectives. It starts by helping readers define what they want to accomplish and shows them exactly how to get there. Included in the book are exercises, case studies, and quick tips. (393 pages)
© 2006
Print$19.95
Web Resourcehttp://www.buildingpowerfulcommunityorganizations.com
Long Haul Press
10 Brattle Terr.
Arlington, MA 02474
Phone: 781-648-1508
E-mail: comments@buildingpowerfulcommunityorganizations.com
Web: http://www.longhaulpress.com

Bully Free Card Game
Allen L. Beane
Based on the Bully Free Classroom series, this card game encourages students to develop caring and respectful attitudes toward others. Played like Crazy Eights, the cards are divided into four categories: "What Would You Do If . . .," "Self-Esteem Boosters," "Ways to Stay Bully Free," and "Why Should You Do This?" Players get rid of their cards by providing prosocial is responses and suggestions to the questions. This card game is designed for grades K–8 and is to be played with adult supervision. The pack includes 60 cards and a 12-page insert.
© 2005
Game$12.95
Free Spirit Publishing
217 Fifth Ave. N, Ste. 200
Minneapolis, MN 55401-1299
Phone: 800-735-7323
Fax: 866-419-5199
Web: http://www.freespirit.com

Bully Free Classroom Poster (New)
Allan L. Beane
Based on the Bully Free Classroom series, this colorful laminated poster sends the positive message that bullying will not be tolerated and everyone deserves respect. Similar in design to a traffic sign, this poster will be a powerful reminder to students to think about their actions and words before engaging in destructive behaviors toward others.
No Date
Poster$6.95
Free Spirit Publishing
217 Fifth Ave. N, Ste. 200
Minneapolis, MN 55401-1299
Phone: 800-735-7323
Fax: 866-419-5199
Web: http://www.freespirit.com

Celebrating America's Youth: The Facts Are Positive (New)
National Clearinghouse on Families & Youth
This report provides statistics on American youth volunteer rates, extracurricular activities, civic and religious activities, academic performance, relationships with parents and family, and healthy behaviors. It also describes the Positive Youth Development approach, which emphasizes self-assurance in young people's competence, usefulness, belonging, and power. (12 pages)
© 2007
Web Resourcehttp://www.helpingamericasyouth.gov/exhibithall/FYSB%20-%20Celebrating%20AmericaÕs%20Youth.pdf
National Clearinghouse on Families & Youth
P.O. Box 13505
Silver Spring, MD 20911-3505
Phone: 301-608-8098
Fax: 301-608-8721
E-mail: info@ncfy.com
Web: http://www.ncfy.com

Celebration Games: Physical Activities for Every Month (New)
Barbara Wnek
Organized around the seasons and holidays, Celebration Games provides fun and engaging games and activities for children in grades K–6. The activities are easy to implement, and they require common materials and equipment. With games like "Spiders in the Web," "Reindeer Training," and "Shamrock Shuffle," this book will show you how to incorporate exciting and enjoyable games into your physical education class or afterschool program. The book also includes ideas for schoolwide events and family activities, as well as an appendix full of reproducible materials for award certificates and bulletin boards and narratives about some of the holidays. (169 pages)
© 2006
Print$17.95
Human Kinetics
P.O. Box 5076
Champaign, IL 61825-5076
Phone: 800-747-4457
Fax: 217-351-1549
Web: http://www.humankinetics.com

Changing Children's Behavior by Changing the People, Places, and Activities in Their Lives (New)
Richard L. Munger
Each path a child takes in life includes a mix of people, places, and activities. This book explores the pathways that will help mold children into motivated, competent, and compassionate adults. The basic concept of the book is that how children spend their time determines the kind of developmental experiences they will have. Most of the chapters are devoted to how children can spend time in environments and activities that are conducive to healthy development. Ten major settings where children spend their time, such as with friends, at school, at afterschool, and at work, are covered. At the end of each environment chapter is a quiz to help parents or professionals determine a child's strengths and weaknesses followed by action steps to improve their environment. A chapter is devoted to the importance of exercise and physical education. This book was intended for use by both parents and professionals. (296 pages)
© 2005
Print$15.95
Boys Town Press
14100 Crawford St.
Boys Town, NE $15.95
Phone: 800-282-6657
E-mail: btpress@girlsandboystown.org
Web: http://www.boystownpress.org

Charting the Benefits of High-Quality After-School Program Experiences: Evidence From New Research on Improving After-School Opportunities for Disadvantaged Youth (New)
Elizabeth R. Reisner, Deborah Lowe Vandell, Ellen M. Pechman, Kim M. Pierce, B. Bradford Brown, and Daniel Bolt
This research focuses on improving afterschool programs and opportunities for youth. The paper examines the policy implications for recent findings from the Promising Program study, which explores how high-quality afterschool programs affect youth. Findings from the study suggest that plans for high-quality afterschool programming should span entire communities, uniting to engage the largest number of at-risk youth. Working alone, afterschool programs offer limited choices; therefore, youth look to other, sometimes less beneficial, settings for more desirable activities. The study finds that working together, afterschool programs can provide a wider array of opportunities for youth. Implications for policy planning are also included in this study. (16 pages)
© 2007
Web Resourcehttp://www.gse.uci.edu/docs/PASP%20Charting%20the%20Benefits.pdf
Policy Studies Associates, Inc.
1718 Connecticut Ave. NW, Ste. 400
Washington, DC 20009
Phone: 202-939-9780
Fax: 202-939-5732
Web: http://www.policystudies.com

Collecting Evaluation Data: An Overview of Sources and Methods
Ellen Taylor-Powell and Sara Steele
This resource provides a general overview of the types and methods of evaluation data available. It groups the most common sources of evaluative information into three categories: existing information, people and pictorial records, and observations. The guide also discusses methods for the collection of evaluation information, including surveys, case studies, interviews, observation, tests, logs, and document analysis, and it outlines various types of evaluation instruments. (11 pages)
© 1996
Print$2.00
Web Resourcehttp://www.uwex.edu/ces/pdande/evaluation/evaldocs.html
Cooperative Extension Publications
University of Wisconsin
45 N. Charter St.
Madison, WI 53715
Phone: 877-947-7827

Collecting Evaluation Data: Direct Observation
Ellen Taylor-Powell and Sara Steele
This publication discusses direct observation as a method of collecting evaluation data. The authors highlight situations when direct observation is useful, including when you want direct information or when you are trying to understand an ongoing behavior or process or unfolding event. The guide lists the program components that should be observed, including behavior, physical surroundings, and interactions, and it discusses what an evaluator should look for during observations and how to record what is observed. The publication also explores requirements and training methods for observers. The appendix includes examples of observation guides that are used to record information. (8 pages)
© 1996
Print$2.00
Web Resourcehttp://www.uwex.edu/ces/pdande/evaluation/evaldocs.html
Cooperative Extension Publications
University of Wisconsin
45 N. Charter St.
Madison, WI 53715
Phone: 877-947-7827

Collecting Evaluation Data: Surveys
Ellen Taylor-Powell and Carol Hermann
This guide offers an extensive overview of conducting surveys to collect evaluation data. It discusses the initial planning that needs to take place before administering a survey, the situations for which a survey is an appropriate evaluation tool, and the process of choosing the most appropriate survey method (e.g., mail surveys, telephone surveys, face-to-face surveys). It also discusses the planning that needs to take place before conducting a survey, the actual implementation of the survey, ways to ensure a good response to the survey, and the interpretation of survey results if the survey response is low. The appendix includes extensive references and samples of telephone survey materials, press releases, and other documents. (27 pages)
© 2000
Print$5.00
Web Resourcehttp://www.uwex.edu/ces/pdande/evaluation/evaldocs.html
Cooperative Extension Publications
University of Wisconsin
45 N. Charter St.
Madison, WI 53715
Phone: 877-947-7827

Colossal Clubs: Activities-Based Curriculum for School-Age Programs (New)
Kathleen Martinez and Sue Edwards
Colossal Clubs provides ideas for incorporating field trips, reading, cooking, gardening, science, and even guest speakers into various clubs. The authors seem to have exhausted every possibility and arranged the book in an imaginative yet organized way, complete with a day-to-day schedule. The text presents 20 clubs and their corresponding activities, supplies, and references. This resource provides tips for engaging children of different ages and skill levels while providing healthy variation for fun. With this resource, afterschool staff may do as little or as much as they are able but should never run out of ideas. (262 pages)
© 2006
Print$24.95
Sue Edwards
1633 Zinfandel Drive
Petaluma, CA 94954
Phone: 707-280-9638
E-mail: sue1633@aol.com

Common-Sense Classroom Management for Middle and High School Teachers (New)
Jill A. Lindberg, Dianne Evans Kelley, and April M. Swick
This practical guide to classroom management offers many teacher-tested ideas appropriate for students in grades 6–12. It contains more than 65 strategies that can be implemented into the classroom with minimal planning. A range of topics, including creating a positive classroom atmosphere, working with diverse student and family populations, transitioning, using reinforcers and consequences, and dealing with challenging students and situations, are covered. Information on how to adapt some of the strategies to students in the upper grades and students with special needs is also provided. (109 pages)
© 2005
Print$27.95
Corwin Press
2455 Teller Rd.
Thousand Oaks, CA 91320-2218
Phone: 800-818-7243
Fax: 800-417-2466
Web: http://www.corwinpress.com

Communicating the Afterschool Message Through the Media
National Center for Community Education with the Afterschool Alliance
The media exert enormous influence on the thinking of the American public. The various forms of media offer excellent opportunities to reach new and large audiences with important messages that influence public perception of afterschool programs or the need for afterschool programs. This practical guide discusses the various types of media and provides detailed guidelines for communicating with them. (40 pages)
No Date
Web Resourcehttp://afterschoolalliance.org/media.cfm
Afterschool Alliance
1616 H St. NW, Ste. 820
Washington, DC 20006
Phone: 202-347-1002
Web: http://www.afterschoolalliance.org

Communicating Your Vision (New)
Talula Cartwright and David Baldwin
Communicating a vision persuasively and clearly often presents a challenge to any leader. The authors of the resource, both veritable communication experts, discuss how to deal with challenges, such as a resistant audience. Afterschool programs run more smoothly when everyone supports and understands the ultimate objective. In order for this to occur, leaders must communicate the vision effectively. (32 pages)
© 2006
Print$9.95
Center for Creative Leadership
P.O. Box 26300
Greensboro, NC 27438-6300
Phone: 336-288-7210
Web: http://www.ccl.org

Community Schools: Partnerships for Excellence
Coalition for Community Schools
This resource defines the concept of a community school and discusses program areas found in community schools, the positive results achieved in existing community schools, and ways to finance community schools. The resource also highlights nine successful community school programs throughout the country. Finally, it lists key community school networks in the United States and their contact information. (16 pages)
No Date
Web Resourcehttp://www.communityschools.org/partnershipsforexcellence.pdf
Coalition for Community Schools
c/o Institute for Educational Leadership
4455 Connecticut Ave. NW, Ste. 310
Washington, DC 20008
Phone: 202-822-8405
Fax: 202-872-4050
E-mail: ccs@iel.org
Web: http://www.communityschools.org

Community Visions, Community Solutions: Grantmaking for Comprehensive Impact
Joseph A. Connor and Stephanie Kadel-Taras
This publication describes a grantmaking process in which funders focus on solutions by helping communities identify their goals and then supporting and sustaining systematic efforts to reach those goals. Community Visions, Community Solutions presents the following topics: how funders can have a real impact on community problems, why many collaborations have failed, and how to support and sustain community problem solving. The appendix contains community governance strategies. (128 pages)
© 2003
Print$41.96
Fieldstone Alliance
60 Plato Blvd. E
St. Paul, MN 55107
Phone: 800-274-6024
Web: http://www.fieldstonealliance.org

Community-Based Learning: Engaging Students for Success and Citizenship (New)
Atelia Melaville, Amy C. Berg, and Martin J. Blank
A survey showed that 95% of students ages 13 to 19 believe opportunities for more realworld learning would improve their school. This coalition report says that community-based learning involves students in real-world problem-solving that is relevant and meaningful and addresses the problem of boredom and disengagement in school. The report includes a collection of teaching and learning strategies, including civic education, work-based education, and service learning. (54 pages)
© 2006
Web Resourcehttp://www.communityschools.org/CCSDocuments/CBLFinal.pdf
Coalition for Community Schools
4455 Connecticut Ave. NW, Ste. 310
Washington, DC 20008
Phone: 202-822-8405 x156
Fax: 202-872-4050
Web: http://www.communityschools.org

Cool Chemistry Concoctions (New)
Joe Rhatigan and Veronika Alice Gunter
With "50 formulas that fizz, foam, splatter, and ooze," this book provides activities that stimulate the senses while teaching fundamentals of chemistry. Most of the activities require simple, inexpensive, readily available ingredients. Although they may fizz and splatter, each is safe but exciting. Chemistry experiments create passion for scientific discovery, develop predictive and critical thinking, and encourage students to work together. The text contains lively illustrations, clear directions, and, most important, thorough explanations for why an experiment may succeed or fail. (80 pages)
© 2007
Print$7.95
Lark Books
67 Broadway
Asheville, NC 28801
Phone: 828-253-0467
Web: http://www.larkbooks.com

Cooperative Games and Sports: Joyful Activities for Everyone, Second Edition (New)
Terry Orlick
Children love to play games, but many times they end up feeling left out, rejected, or hurt. This book focuses on positive cooperative games where everyone can win and feel accepted while still having fun. Included are more than 150 field-tested activities and games for various age groups and numbers of players. They do not require expensive equipment, and they can be easily adapted to fit the age group, number of players, and setting. A chapter is also included on how to create your own games and how to instruct children to develop imaginative and fun activities of their own. The directions for each activity are simple, straightforward, and easy to implement. With very little time and preparation, you will have children engaged in exciting activities designed to promote self-worth, cooperation, acceptance, and fun. (163 pages)
© 2006
Print$18.95
Human Kinetics
P.O. Box 5076
Champaign, IL 61825-5076
Phone: 800-747-4457
Fax: 217-351-1549
Web: http://www.humankinetics.com

Core Principles for Engaging Young People in Community Change (New)
Karen Pittman, Shanetta Martin, and Anderson Williams
This resource describes eight principles that any organization can use to help youth see that they have the responsibility and resources to improve their communities. The eight principles are: (1) designing an aggressive outreach strategy, (2) creating a strong home base, (3) identifying core issues, (4) conveying an intentional philosophy, (5) creating youth/ adult teams, (6) building youth and adult capacity, (7) providing individual support, and (8) sustaining access and influence. These principles were formulated from field research and are designed to engage young people in impacting a community. The authors describe each principle and provide concrete examples of implementation along with reflection questions. (32 pages)
© 2007
Print$5.00
Web Resourcehttp://www.forumfyi.org/files/FINALYouth_Engagment_8.15pdf.pdf
Forum for Youth Investment and Impact Strategies, Inc.
The Cady-Lee House
7064 Eastern Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20012-2031
Phone: 202-207-3333
Fax: 202-207-3329
E-mail: youth@forumfyi.org
Web: http://www.forumfyi.org

Creating a Bully-Free Classroom: An Effective Framework With Strategies and Activities That Build a Safe Classroom Community Where All Children Thrive (New)
Carol S. McMullen
Almost all children are bullied at some point, and teachers often witness it going on but do not know how to prevent it or solve it. This book provides ideas and strategies, which are based on research, designed to promote problem-solving skills and skills for relating successfully with others. The activities can easily be implemented in any classroom. Integrating these activities into the school day helps students become more aware of the issues of bullying and how to deal with them appropriately. Using the ideas in this book, the teacher will move from the role of problem-solver to the role of facilitator. Watch as students learn to solve conflicts independently and take part in their own action plans for bullying. (112 pages)
© 2005
Print$17.99
Scholastic, Inc.
557 Broadway
New York, NY 10012
Phone: 800-724-6527
Web: http://www.scholastic.com

Creating Dedicated Local and State Revenue Sources for Youth Programs (New)
Rachel H. Sherman, Sharon G. Deich, and Barbara Hanson Langford
This brief outlines strategies to create dedicated local and state revenue sources for youth programs and profiles these strategies at work in different states and communities. The authors also provide guidance and information on the capacity, funding, and community support required to create local and state dedicated revenue sources. The details for achieving dedicated revenue funding such as initiative and referendums are defined and explained. (32 pages)
© 2007
Print$20.00
Web Resourcehttp://76.12.61.196/publications/DLR_PM.pdf
The Finance Project
1401 New York Ave. NW, Ste. 800
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-628-4200
Fax: 202-628-1293
E-mail: info@financeproject.org
Web: http://www.financeproject.org

Creating Rules With Students in a Responsive Classroom (New)
Northeast Foundation for Children
This DVD guides you through one third-grade teacher's process of creating rules in her classroom. You will watch the children discover what their hopes and goals are for the year, brainstorm ideas for classroom rules, categorize these rules, and create a short list of final rules that they will live by throughout the year. Having children be part of the process makes the rules more meaningful and helps the children take ownership and responsibility for them. The process this teacher uses could be easily adapted to fit various grade levels. (35 minutes)
© 2007
DVD$19.95
Northeast Foundation for Children
85 Avenue A, Ste. 204
P.O. Box 718
Turners Falls, MA 01376-0718
Phone: 800-360-6332
Fax: 877-206-3952
Web: http://www.responsiveclassroom.org

Critical Hours: Afterschool Programs and Educational Success
Beth M. Miller
This resource explores the links between afterschool programs and positive youth development, particularly during early adolescence. Based on research findings on afterschool programs and promoting learning, the report makes the following conclusions: youth benefit from consistent participation in well-run, quality afterschool programs; afterschool programs can increase engagement in learning; afterschool programs can increase educational equity; and afterschool programs can build the key skills necessary for success in today's economy. Each of these conclusions is backed by specific research studies and evaluations of afterschool programs. Critical Hours also examines three of the most common approaches to enhancing the academic impact of programs: homework time, linkages with the school day, and literacy development. (118 pages)
© 2003
Web Resourcehttp://www.nmefdn.org/uploads/Critical_Hours.pdf
Nellie Mae Education Foundation
1250 Hancock St., Ste. 205N
Quincy, MA 02169
Phone: 781-348-4200
Fax: 781-348-4299
Web: http://www.nmefdn.org

Demographic Differences in Youth Out-of-School Time Participation: A Research Summary (New)
Harvard Family Research Project
This summary reports findings from two publications examining differences in participation in out-of-school-time activities among youth from varying socioeconomic and racial and ethnic backgrounds. Policy application suggestions follow each key finding. (2 pages)
© 2007
Web Resourcehttp://www.gse.harvard.edu/hfrp/content/projects/afterschool/resources/researchsummary.pdf
Harvard Family Research Project
Harvard Graduate School of Education
3 Garden St.
Cambridge, MA 02138
Phone: 617-495-9108
Fax: 617-495-8594
E-mail: hfrp@gse.harvard.edu
Web: http://www.hfrp.org

Discipline in School-Age Care: Control the Climate, Not the Children
Dale Borman Fink
In this book, the author asks school-age care staff to rethink their attitudes about behavior and discipline in children under their care. By examining six key elements of a school-age care program, the author discusses how the structure of the program may be contributing to behavior problems and suggests ideas on how to resolve those problems. These six elements are (1) the child's basic needs, (2) the physical environment, (3) activities and schedules, (4) social groupings, (5) rules, and (6) consequences. The book also has scenarios and exercises to complete to assist the reader in applying the information shared. (43 pages)
© 2004
Print$8.95
School-Age Notes
P.O. Box 476
New Albany, OH 43054
Phone: 800-410-8780
Fax: 888-410-8260
Web: http://www.schoolagenotes.com

Discipline in the Secondary Classroom: A Positive Approach to Behavior Management (New)
Randall S. Sprick
One of the greatest challenges facing teachers is how to effectively manage behaviors in the classroom. This resource offers positive approaches to help high school teachers spend less time attending to disruption and more time instructing. It provides step-by-step guides to implementing research-based strategies to help increase student motivation and success. The proactive and positive techniques are designed to help teachers prevent problems before they occur. The book discusses such issues as classroom organization, management plans, teaching expectations, rules and consequences, and motivation, and the many samples and reproducible forms make this a practical resource. The appendixes provide excellent evaluation tools to help you collect data on student behavior and assess and revise your management plan as necessary. (286 pages)
© 2006
Print$29.95
Jossey-Bass
989 Market St.
San Francisco, CA 94103-1741
Phone: 800-956-7739
Fax: 415-433-0499
Web: http://www.josseybass.com

Discovering Community: Activities for Afterschool Programs (New)
Georgia Hall
Each activity in this book is explained in two parts, which are followed by discussion starters and sharing. On each activity page is a sidebar with the time it takes for the activity, materials needed, and goals for the activity. The projects highlighted in this publication were conducted within school-based afterschool programs operated by community-based organizations with middle school students.
© 2006
Web Resourcehttp://www.niost.org/publications/Discovering%20Community%20Activity%20Guide%20PDF.pdf
National Institute on Out-of-School Time
Wellesley Centers for Women at Wellesley College
106 Central St.
Wellesley, MA 02481
Phone: 781-283-2547
Fax: 781-283-3657
Web: http://www.niost.org

Documenting Progress and Demonstrating Results: Evaluating Local Out-of-School Time Programs
Priscilla Little, Sharon DuPree, and Sharon Deich
This brief provides afterschool practitioners with the techniques, tools, and strategies they need to improve their programs and track their effectiveness longitudinally. The authors also present information about many areas of evaluation so that programs can ultimately conduct self-evaluations. The guide is divided into four parts. Part 1 reviews the key issues for conducting a program evaluation, including the program's stage of development, the program's target population, and the information funders expect to glean from the evaluation. Part 2 looks at the elements of a logic model and explains how it can be a useful instrument in program design and evaluation. Part 3 examines the five-tiered approach to evaluation, which involves early planning, documentation of program services, clarification of the program's intent, modification of the program, and demonstration of program impact. Part 4 discusses how to creatively disseminate information about the evaluation to stakeholders. The appendix includes evaluation terminology and a review of common data-collection methods. (48 pages)
© 2002
Web Resourcehttp://www.financeprojectinfo.org/Publications/OSTlocalevaluation.pdf
The Finance Project
1401 New York Ave., Ste. 800
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-628-4200
Fax: 202-628-1293
E-mail: info@financeproject.org
Web: http://www.financeproject.org

Family Math II: Achieving Success in Mathematics
Grace Davila Coates and Virginia Thomson
Family Math II presents mathematics materials to help families learn and enjoy mathematics together. This K–6 resource provides an interactive approach to understanding math content. The activities—many of which are presented as games and investigations—are easy to follow, engaging, and challenging. Organized by math topics and grade level, Family Math II is a good supplemental text for teachers and afterschool providers. Family Math for Young Children, Family Math: The Middle School Years and Math for Girls also are available from this publisher. (200 pages)
© 2003
Print$22.95
EQUALS
University of California, Berkeley
Lawrence Hall of Science #5200
Berkeley, CA 94720
Phone: 800-897-5036
Fax: 510-643-5757
Web: http://www.lawrencehallofscience.org/equals/EQbkFMII.html

Field Guide to Nonprofit Program Design, Marketing, and Evaluation, Fourth Edition (Revised)
Carter McNamara
This updated reference provides thorough, yet concise, guidelines for all critical aspects of a nonprofit program. It is written in an easy-to-implement style that includes 25 worksheets in an appendix and online. The highly practical resource can be used at any stage of development of the nonprofit program. For example, it can be used to conduct preparatory strategic planning, perform a market analysis, plan finances, develop credible fundraising proposals, and evaluate performance against goals and outcomes. (252 pages)
© 2006
Print$32.00
Authenticity Consulting
4008 Lake Drive Ave. North
Minneapolis, MN 55422-1508
Phone: 800-971-2250
Fax: 763-592-1661
Web: http://www.authenticityconsulting.com

Finders and Keepers: Helping New Teachers Survive and Thrive in Our Schools (New)
Susan Moore Johnson
There is growing concern about teacher quality and teacher retention. This resource discusses some of the findings of a longitudinal study of 50 new teachers. After 4 years, one third of the 50 teachers had left public school teaching, and another one third had changed schools or districts. This book highlights 10 of the teachers from that study. These 10 teachers describe their reasons for entering the field, what their expectations were, what they encountered in the schools, and how they decided to stay in the field or move on to other jobs. For anyone looking to address the issue of finding quality teachers and keeping them, Finders and Keepers provides valuable insight. It reveals the crucial role that the setting plays, as well as how important principals and experienced teachers are to hiring and retaining quality teachers. (314 pages)
© 2004
Print$17.95
Jossey-Bass
989 Market St.
San Francisco, CA 94103-1741
Phone: 800-956-7739
Fax: 415-433-0499
Web: http://www.josseybass.com

Finding Funding: A Guide to Federal Sources for Youth Programs (New)
Dionne Dobbins-Harper and Soumya Bhat
This guide is broken into five sections. The first section is an overview of the funding landscape of public and private investments in youth programming and the key challenges for community leaders and policymakers. The second section describes the structure and requirement of various federal funding mechanisms to fund programs. The third section discusses the criteria the Finance Project used to guide its research on federal funding sources and analyzes the broad domains used in the framework. The fourth section gives strategies for maximizing federal funds and building partnerships. Youth programs that have used creative funding strategies are highlighted. The fifth section contains a catalog of 103 funding sources that support youth programming.
© 2007
Print$30.00
Web Resourcehttp://76.12.61.196/publications/findingfunding_PM.pdf
The Finance Project
1401 New York Ave. NW, Ste. 800
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-628-4200
Fax: 202-628-1293
E-mail: info@financeproject.org
Web: http://www.financeproject.org

Finding Funding: Grantwriting From Start to Finish, Including Project Management and Internet Use, Fifth Edition
Ernest W. Brewer and Charles M. Achilles
The updated edition of Finding Funding shares the latest technology used in and strategies of successful grantwriting. This resource is a practical guide on how to locate the most appropriate funders for programs, how to refine grant proposals to meet the funders' needs and preferences, and how to administer and manage a grant to be in compliance with all grant regulations and legal obligations. (424 pages)
© 2007
Print$39.95
Corwin Press
2455 Teller Rd.
Thousand Oaks, CA 91320
Phone: 800-233-9936
Fax: 800-417-2466
Web: http://www.corwinpress.com

Findings From HFRP's Study of Predictors of Participation in Out-of-School Time Activities: Fact Sheet (New)
Harvard Family Research Project
This resource summarizes findings and implications from a recent Harvard Family Research Project study that examined the child, family, school, and neighborhood predictors of children's participation in out-of-school-time activities. Key findings for out-of-school-time practitioners are included. (3 pages)
© 2007
Web Resourcehttp://www.gse.harvard.edu/hfrp/content/projects/afterschool/resources/factsheet.pdf
Harvard Family Research Project
Harvard Graduate School of Education
3 Garden St.
Cambridge, MA 02138
Phone: 617-495-9108
Fax: 617-495-8594
E-mail: hfrp@gse.harvard.edu
Web: http://www.hfrp.org

Five Standards for Effective Teaching: How to Succeed With All Learners, Grades K–8 (New)
Stephanie Stoll Dalton
Aimed at educators of K–8 learners, this book prepares teachers to follow five standards for organizing their classrooms: (1) teacher and student producing together, (2) developing language and literacy, (3) connecting learning to students' worlds, (4) challenging students' thinking, and (5) using instructional conversation. The first part of the book presents research and rationale for the five standards, and the second part addresses each standard individually in depth and concludes with an integrative framework for a system to support and expand classroom teaching. Appropriate appendixes provide additional references, ideas, and support. (304 pages)
© 2008
Print$24.95
Jossey-Bass
989 Market St.
San Francisco, CA 94103-1741
Phone: 800-956-7739
Fax: 415-433-0499
Web: http://www.josseybass.com

Fun Literacy Activities for After-School Programs (New)
Sue Edwards and Kathleen Martinez
Using the ideas presented in this resource, afterschool program facilitators can help students make their own books, draw a word family tree, and share stories with one another. The text also serves as a teaching guide for staff who may not be familiar with elements of language and developmental stages of reading. Each activity outlines roles, time, supplies needed, directions, purpose, and extra ideas. Seventy-two activities target all levels from emergent readers to independent readers (ages 5–14). Afterschool staff may enhance literacy in a fun and socially rewarding way using the activities in this book. (206 pages)
© 2004
Print$24.95
School-Age Notes
P.O. Box 476
New Albany, OH 43054
Phone: 800-410-8780
Web: http://www.schoolagenotes.com

Funding Education Beyond High School: The Guide to Federal Student Aid (New)
U.S. Department of Education
This U.S. Department of Education guide to federal student aid explains the financial assistance available through grants, loans, and work-study from the U.S. government for anyone interested in pursuing an education beyond high school. Most important, the publication explains how to apply for that aid either online or by mail. The publication tells students what information is needed and explains the process for filling out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (commonly known as the FAFSA). The booklet also explains what the FAFSA4caster is and how it can be used to give parents and students an estimate of education cost before they actually fill out the FAFSA. Other helpful information such as reducing the cost of education and avoiding scholarship scams is also included
© 2007
Web Resourcehttp://studentaid.ed.gov/students/attachments/siteresources/FundingEduBeyondHighSchool_0809.pdf
U.S. Department of Education
P.O. Box 1398
Jessup, MD 20794-1398
Phone: 800-394-7084
Fax: 301-470-1244
E-mail: orders@FSApubs.org
Web: http://www.studentaid.ed.gov

Giving Parents Options: Strategies for Informing Parents and Implementing Public School Choice and Supplemental Educational Services Under No Child Left Behind
U.S. Department of Education and Office of Innovation and Improvement
School districts are required to offer families supplemental educational services (SES) and school transfers if their district does not meet the performance goals of No Child Left Behind for several years in a row. There are very low participant rates for school districts in these areas, however; many families are unable to take advantage of the options. This handbook is intended to be a guide for districts to assist in implementing public school choice and SES more effectively. The information included is based on visits to 14 school districts conducted by the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Innovation and Improvement. This handbook can give districts guidance and direction on topics such as reaching and informing parents, facilitating applications and enrollment, providing transportation to and from selected schools and SES programs, and gaining support from the state education agency. (44 pages)
© 2007
Web Resourcehttp://www.ed.gov/admins/comm/choice/options/givingparentsoptions.pdf
ED Pubs, Education Publications Center
U.S. Department of Education
P.O. Box 1398
Jessup, MD 20794-1398
Phone: 877-433-7827
Fax: 301-470-1244
E-mail: edpubs@inet.ed.gov
Web: http://www.ed.gov

Global GraffitiWall (New)
Center for Afterschool and Community Education
A companion book to GraffitiWall, this new resource offers many additional "wall" activities for afterschool students. As the title implies, these activities have a multicultural theme with titles ranging from "Multilingual Letter Scramble" to "World Traveler." Designed for all ages, these activities encourage skill-building in a challenging, fun manner. (79 pages)
© 2008
Print$24.95
Center for Afterschool Education
Moorestown West Corporate Center
2 Executive Dr., Ste. 4
Moorestown, NJ 08057
Phone: 856-533-2702
Fax: 856-533-2701
Web: http://www.afterschooled.org

GraffitiWall (New)
Center for Afterschool and Community Education
GraffitiWall is a resource designed to get students in afterschool programs involved in academic activities that also integrate youth development and social skills. The unique characteristic of this publication is "the wall" aspect of the activities. Students are encouraged to line the walls or whatever space is available in the learning environment as the culmination of each activity. Step-by-step directions and variations for ages and levels are provided for each activity. (79 pages)
© 2006
Print and CD-ROM$19.95
Center for Afterschool Education
Moorestown West Corporate Center
2 Executive Dr., Ste. 4
Moorestown, NJ 08057
Phone: 856-533-2702
Fax: 856-533-2701
Web: http://www.afterschooled.org

Guide to NAA Program Accreditation (New)
National AfterSchool Association
This updated resource explains the National AfterSchool Association accreditation process, including understanding benefits and costs, deciding if you are ready, and completing the application. The guide also contains the needed forms and discusses building circles of support for quality at varying levels. Additional support materials can be purchased with this guide or ordered separately.
© 2007
Print$40.00
National AfterSchool Association
529 Main St., Ste. 214
Charlestown, MA 02129
Phone: 800-617-8242
Fax: 617-778-6025
Web: http://www.naaweb.org

Half a Childhood: Quality Programs for Out-of-School Hours, Third Edition
Judith Bender, Charles H. Flatter, and Jeanette M. Sorrentino
Half a Childhood focuses on creating a high-quality experience for children ages 5–14 during out-of-school hours. Chapters cover everything from defining school-age care and how it supports families to hiring staff and fostering strong staff-child relationships. This new edition describes school-age children and the range of issues regarding school-age care. Half a Childhood also addresses managing behavior, creating a balanced program, and establishing a quality physical environment both indoors and outdoors. (299 pages)
© 2005
Print$22.95
School-Age Notes
P.O. Box 476
New Albany, OH 43054
Phone: 800-410-8780
Fax: 888-410-8260
Web: http://www.schoolagenotes.com

Helping Practitioners Meet the Goals of No Child Left Behind (New)
U.S. Department of Education and Office of Educational Technology
Technology, if used appropriately and effectively, can transform student learning and student achievement. This report from the U.S. Department of Education is a compilation of papers written by technology experts and educators designed to help school leaders find better ways to incorporate technology into the schools—ways that will also meet the goals of No Child Left Behind. The information provided is divided into two sections. One addresses accountability and assessment using technology, and the other discusses increasing options through e-learning. Several detailed diagrams also outline ideas such as a technology framework and the benefits of online testing and online individualized education programs. (64 pages)
© 2004
Web Resourcehttp://www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/os/technology/reports/help-pract.pdf
U.S. Department of Education
P.O. Box 1398
Jessup, MD 20794-1398
Phone: 877-433-7827
Fax: 301-470-1244
E-mail: edpubs@inet.ed.gov
Web: http://www.ed.gov

Helping Youth Succeed Through Out-of-School Time Programs (New)
American Youth Policy Forum
This publication for policymakers and practitioners provides solid research on, examples of, and recommendations for out-of-school-time programs. Part 1 is a literature review on out-of-schooltime programs and how they are effective in improving youth skills and outcomes. Part 2 shows emerging practices and examples of advanced programs in the United States. Part 3 offers recommendations on program development, expectations, and requirements. A list of out-ofschool- time programs and their directors' names and contact information is also provided. (55 pages)
© 2006
Web Resourcehttp://www.aypf.org/publications/HelpingYouthOST2006.pdf
American Youth Policy Forum
1836 Jefferson Pl. NW
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202-775-9731
Fax: 202-775-9733
Web: http://www.aypf.org

Home, School, and Community Partnerships
Larry E. Decker and Virginia A. Decker
This book assists educational leaders, teachers, family members, and community advocates in creating and maintaining home-school-community partnerships. The authors present ideas and strategies for engaging people—whether they are individuals, agencies, businesses, or organizations—in partnerships with schools. Specifically, the book examines the principles and strategies for building family and community partnerships, the essential role of communities in supporting schools, school-community collaborations, the political realities of school partnerships, school safety and crisis management and its impact on partnerships, and ways to plan and evaluate your own comprehensive home-school-community partnership. The appendix includes contact information and Web sites organized by content area as additional resources. (284 pages)
© 2003
Print$32.95
Rowman and Littlefield Publishing Group
4501 Forbes Blvd., Ste. 200
Lanham, MD 20706
Phone: 800-462-6420
Fax: 717-794-3803
Web: http://www.rowmaneducation.com

How Afterschool Programs Can Most Effectively Promote Positive Youth Development as a Support to Academic Achievement: A Report Commissioned by the Boston After-School for All Partnership
Georgia Hall, Nicole Yohalem, Joel Tolman, and Alicia Wilson
In this publication, the researchers report ways in which quality afterschool programs can help young people succeed both academically and developmentally. The resource presents a review of learning theories, explains the features and rationale of the positive youth development approach, provides examples of local and national programs utilizing positive strategies, articulates the challenges Boston faces, and offers recommendations for both short-term and long-term actions and policy activities. (95 pages)
© 2003
Web Resourcehttp://www.niost.org/WCW3.pdf
National Institute on Out-of-School Time
Wellesley Centers for Women at Wellesley College
105 Central St.
Wellesley, MA 02481
Phone: 781-283-2547
Fax: 781-283-3657
Web: http://www.niost.org

How the Arts Can Enhance After-School Programs
U.S. Department of Education and National Endowment for the Arts
This report provides an introduction to the role of the arts in afterschool programs. It includes a brief summary of recent research findings about both arts and afterschool programs, a description of the key elements of successful programs, and examples of successful programs and partnerships. (24 pages)
© 2002
Web Resourcehttp://www.arts.gov/pub/artsafterschool/artsedpub.html
National Endowment for the Arts
1100 Pennsylvania Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20506
Phone: 202-682-5400
Web: http://www.arts.gov

How to Be Bully Free Workbook (New)
Allan L. Beane
Kids will learn what bullying is, what it looks like, and skills for handling anger and being kind with the activities provided in this workbook. It can be used by itself, with any anti-bullying program, or as a companion to The Bully Free Classroom. The activities, designed for children in grades 3–5, are engaging and practical. Word searches, writing activities, mazes, what-ifs, and other fun activities get kids thinking about bullying and how to make their schools bully free.
© 2006
Print$5.95
Free Spirit Publishing
217 Fifth Ave. N, Ste. 200
Minneapolis, MN 55401-1299
Phone: 800-735-7323
Fax: 866-419-5199
E-mail: help4kids@freespirit.com

How to Reach and Teach Children With ADD/ADHD: Practical Techniques, Strategies, and Interventions, Second Edition (New)
Sandra F. Rief
This book is a valuable resource for anyone teaching children who have been diagnosed with ADD/ADHD. In addition to addressing the special needs of these students, it also provides strategies that will work for other students who may be underachieving. The book provides information on a number of topics, including preventing classroom behavioral problems; cooperative learning techniques; communicating effectively with parents, physicians, and agencies; and techniques for relaxation/visualization. (464 pages)
© 2005
Print$32.95
Jossey-Bass
989 Market St.
San Francisco, CA 94103-1741
Phone: 800-956-7739
Fax: 415-433-0499
Web: http://www.josseybass.com

How to Teach Nutrition to Kids, Third Edition (New)
Connie Liakos Evers
With the majority of children in part- or full-time afterschool care, these programs have a unique opportunity to use the hours after school for enrichment and continued learning. The science of nutrition, a topic becoming more popular with rising childhood obesity, may seem a complex and dry topic for children, but this recently updated guide provides positive information and fun activity ideas complete with illustrations. The author goes beyond the old food pyramid and includes many simple, healthy recipes. The book teaches adults and children how to make beneficial dietary choices, empowering them by explaining how to have a positive self-image, encouraging physical fitness, and emphasizing healthy eating habits. (247 pages)
© 2006
Print$19.95
24 Carrot Press
P.O. Box 23546
Portland, OR 97281-3546
Phone: 503-524-9318
Web: http://www.nutritionforkids.com

Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion (New)
Robert B. Cialdini
This resource explains the psychology of why people say "yes" through six universal principles. Each chapter and accompanying anecdotes develop readers' skills in meeting crucial objectives, effecting behavioral changes, and ultimately influencing a positive atmosphere. The author invokes productive humor and personality throughout the text and uses literary, social, and historical references to illustrate principles in an interesting and educational way. (320 pages)
© 2007
Print$17.95
Harper-Collins
10 E. 53rd St.
New York, NY 10022
Web: http://www.harpercollins.com

Investing in the Sustainability of Youth Programs: An Assessment Tool for Funders (New)
Barbara Hanson Langford
Private funding sources have become important sources of support for innovative youth programs. Most private funding initiatives, however, are focused on start-up or expansion with a short timeframe—3 years being the most common. This brief with its accompanying assessment tool is intended to help foundation leaders address the challenges of sustainability. It provides a framework for thinking about sustainability, an assessment tool funders can use to support sustainability in their grantmaking, and guidance on how to use and adapt the tool for particular purposes. (18 pages)
© 2007
Web Resourcehttp://www.financeproject.org/Publications/FundersTool.pdf
The Finance Project
1401 New York Ave. NW, Ste. 800
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-628-4200
Fax: 202-628-1293
E-mail: info@financeproject.org
Web: http://www.financeproject.org

Journey Into Community: Looking Inside the Community Learning Center (Revised)
Steve R. Parson
This resource emphasizes the benefits of developing community learning centers. The author provides a roadmap for educators, parents, and community leaders who want to capitalize on these strengths. It also discusses the tools needed to achieve educational goals through the establishment of community learning centers. (160 pages)
© 2004
Print$19.95
Eye on Education
6 Depot Way W
Larchmont, NY 10538
Phone: 888-299-5350
Fax: 914-833-0761
Web: http://www.eyeoneducation.com

Kinship Care Resource Kit for Community and Faith-Based Organizations: Helping Grandparents and Other Relatives Raising Children (New)
Children's Defense Fund
Kinship care families often face difficulties and challenges due to lack of support or resources. Many of them are older individuals. They may have health problems of their own or may be living on limited incomes. This resource may help local organizations make a difference. It provides information on starting a support group, setting up a respite care program, and providing parenting education programs for kinship caregivers. Other sections address such issues as cash assistance, child care and early education, child welfare and foster care, housing, juvenile justice, legal options, and more. Important phone numbers and Web sites are listed throughout the guide to help readers locate further information on any topic. (84 pages)
No Date
Web Resourcehttp://www.childrensdefense.org/site/DocServer/full.pdf?docid=526
ChildrenÕs Defense Fund
25 E St. NW
Washington, DC 20001
Phone: 800-233-1200
E-mail: cdinfo@childrensdefense.org
Web: http://www.childrensdefense.org

Leading After-School Learning Communities: What Principals Should Know and Be Able to Do (New)
National Association of Elementary School Principals
Principals have a key opportunity to share in the development of a successful afterschool program. Another edition in the Leading Learning Communities series, Leading After- School Learning Communities is an excellent resource for principals who strive to enrich the afterschool experience. This resource offers a new perspective on the purpose of afterschool, encouraging principals and collaborators to reinvent programs to focus on creative, productive supplementary activities. In addition, the guide provides suggestions for how to implement such programs, how to involve the community and culture of the school, and how to evaluate the current and future effectiveness of afterschool programs. The information is practical and clear and encourages a broad vision of afterschool success. (114 pages)
© 2006
Print$26.95
National Association of Elementary School Principals
1615 Duke St.
Alexandria, VA 22314-3483
Phone: 800-38-NAESP
Fax: 800-39-NAESP
Web: http://www.naesp.org

Leading by Example: Straight Talk From the World's Top Business Leaders (New)
Harvard Business School Press
Not everyone is a born leader. This resource, a product of the Lessons Learned series, presents leaders' stories in their own words—some cautionary tales and others full of hopeful wisdom. As with all Lessons Learned books, Leading by Example features prominent figures from academia, business, and the public sector. Each anecdote provides bulleted "takeaways," which clearly elucidate the main lessons learned. Leadership often means learning some of the hardest lessons presented in the text, including "Leadership is not a popularity contest" and "The front line is the bottom line." Other issues include maintaining humility, being a good listener, and always encouraging a positive atmosphere. (100 pages)
© 2007
Print$9.95
Harvard Business School Publishing
60 Harvard Way
Boston, MA 02163
Web: http://www.hbspress.org

Leading in a Culture of Change (New)
Michael Fullan
Through five chapters of this seven-chapter book, the author develops a comprehensive theory of leadership. There are five themes that Fullan believes are compatible and synergistic for leadership: moral purpose, understanding change, developing relationships, knowledge building, and coherence making. In the final chapter, Fullan discusses becoming a leader, systemic change, and cultivating leadership at all levels. It includes discussion questions at the end of the book. (166 pages)
© 2001
Print$17.95
Jossey-Bass
989 Market St.
San Francisco, CA 94103-1741
Phone: 800-956-7739
Fax: 415-433-0499
Web: http://www.josseybass.com

Learning In and Out of School in Diverse Environments (New)
James A. Banks, Kathryn H. Au, Arnetha F. Ball, Philip Bell, Edmund W. Gordon, Kris D. GutiŽrrez, Shirley Brice Heath, Carol D. Lee, Yuhshi Lee, Jabari Mahiri, Na'ilah Suad Nasir, Guadalupe Valdés, and Min Zhou
The researchers involved in this report developed a set of four principles that educational practitioners, policymakers, and future researchers could use to understand and build on the learning that occurs in the homes and community cultures of diverse students with the hope that the achievement gap between marginalized students and mainstream students can be reduced. There are four parts of this report. Part 1 describes the educational implications of significant changes related to demographics and globalization that are occurring in the United States and around the world. Part 2 describes life-long, life-wide, and life-deep learning and states why these concepts should guide learning inside and outside of schools and other educational institutions. Part 3 focuses on the four principles. Part 4 includes conclusions and recommendations. (36 pages)
© 2007
Print$12.00
Web Resourcehttp://depts.washington.edu/centerme/LEARNING%20LIFE%20REPORT.pdf
LIFE Center
University of Washington
210 Miller, Box 353600
Seattle, WA 98195-3600
Phone: 206-616-4480
Web: http://www.life-slc.org

Links to Learning: A Curriculum Planning Guide to After-School Programs (New)
National Institute on Out-of-School Time: Wellesley Centers for Women
Covering a broad range of topics from technology to music, this resource provides tools to train afterschool staff and volunteers. It discusses childhood development as well as teaching techniques. Afterschool facilitators may use the tips for planning, implementing, and evaluating afterschool activities. The resource introduces seven key learning areas— literacy, science, math problem solving, arts, social competence, fitness and nutrition, and technology—and discusses reasons to include each learning area, how to implement the subject, whom to target, and possible activities. (180 pages)
© 2005
Print$34.95
School-Age Notes
P.O. Box 476
New Albany, OH 43054
Phone: 800-410-8780
Web: http://www.schoolagenotes.com

Links to Learning: Supporting Learning in Out-of-School Time Programs
National Institute on Out-of-School Time
This video describes the role that afterschool programs play in contributing to children's learning and overall development. Research has identified the following as necessary to succeed in today's economy: literacy and numeracy, written and oral communication skills, problem-solving and critical-thinking skills, knowledge of and comfort with technology, and the ability to work with diverse groups of people. After introducing the viewer to these skills, the video shows many afterschool programs that are implementing them in their daily activities. With these examples, the video helps the viewer tie the research concepts discussed on the tape to everyday afterschool programming. (12 minutes)
© 2003
Video$20.00
National Institute on Out-of-School Time
Wellesley Centers for Women at Wellesley College
106 Central St.
Wellesley, MA 02481
Phone: 781-283-2547
Fax: 781-283-3657
Web: http://www.niost.org

Making Change Stick: Twelve Principles for Transforming Organizations (New)
Richard C. Reale
This resource smoothly introduces leadership principles useful to everyone, regardless of experience level. The text investigates reasons behind the frequent failure of making change stick. Enduring change requires adaptation, superior communication, and commitment. Anecdotes add a personal touch, varying perspectives, and lessons. Every chapter follows with a "Questions to Ponder" section and simple instructions on how to implement the practices. The underlying theme is that, whether as an individual or an organization, the decision to effect change must be actively enforced. The principles make sticking to the change attainable. (166 pages)
© 2005
Print$19.50
Positive Impact Associates, Inc.

Park Ridge, NJ
Phone: 201-573-0027
Web: http://www.p-impact.com

Making the Case: A Fact Sheet on School-Age Children's Out-of-School Time
National Institute on Out-of-School Time
This updated fact sheet provides important information and research about children and out-of-school time. The resource is valuable in establishing a need for out-of-school programs in grant proposals and other funding scenarios, as well as garnering school and community support for these programs. The fact sheet gives statistics on demographics of children today, describes how children and youth spend time after school, offers proof that children can benefit from participation in high-quality programs, and discusses trends in funding. (8 pages)
© 2007
Web Resourcehttp://www.niost.org/publications/Final2007FactSheet.pdf
National Institute on Out-of-School Time
Wellesley Centers for Women at Wellesley College
106 Central St.
Wellesley, MA 02481
Phone: 781-283-2547
Fax: 781-283-3657
Web: http://www.niost.org

Making the Difference: Research and Practice in Community Schools
Martin J. Blank, Atelia Melaville, and Bela P. Shah
The report examines 20 different community school initiatives across the United States with evidence that they have impacted education in four important areas: student learning, family engagement with students and schools, school effectiveness, and community vitality. Chapter 1 discusses the advantages that community schools have over traditional schools. Chapter 2 establishes five essential conditions for learning that are possible because of community schools' unique advantages. Chapter 3 provides an overview of 20 current evaluations of community school initiatives and the positive impact they have on students, schools, families, and communities. Chapter 4 helps interested parties move from research to practice. Finally, chapter 5 offers an action agenda for stakeholders who want to promote community schools in their area. (72 pages)
© 2003
Print$12.00
Web Resourcehttp://www.communityschools.org/mtd.homepage.html
Coalition for Community Schools
c/o Institute for Educational Leadership
1001 Connecticut Ave. NW, Ste. 310
Washington, DC 20008
Phone: 202-822-8405, ext. 156
Fax: 202-872-4050
E-mail: ccs@iel.org
Web: http://www.communityschools.org

Making the News: A Guide for Activists and Nonprofits, Revised and Updated Edition
Jason Salzman
Written specifically for activists and nonprofits, this revised and updated edition of Making the News explains how to generate news coverage for important causes and issues. The book has a detailed index and table of contents to allow you to access information quickly without having to read entire chapters. Based on interviews with professional journalists and media experts, this user-friendly resource describes how to stage media events, write news releases, and promote stories. (289 pages)
© 2003
Print$16.95
Basic Books
1094 Flex Dr.
Jackson, TN 39301
Phone: 800-343-4499
Fax: 800-351-5073
Web: http://www.perseusbooksgroup.com

Managing Change: Straight Talk From the World's Top Business Leaders (New)
Harvard Business School Press
Managing Change is a compact yet crucial resource to anyone in a leadership role. The text offers real anecdotes from successful business leaders in top positions in companies such as Morgan Stanley, Ford Motor Company, and Avon. Each individual's lesson ties into one of several themes, many of which relate to school administration. Themes include overcoming bureaucratic obstacles, maintaining communication, and handling culture clashes. Each lesson includes a story and a final "Takeaways" section with bulleted highlights. The anecdotes offer practical wisdom applicable to starting, managing, and successfully implementing an afterschool program. (98 pages)
© 2007
Print$9.95
Harvard Business School Publishing
60 Harvard Way
Boston, MA 02163
Web: http://www.hbspress.org

Measuring Youth Program Quality: A Guide to Assessment Tools (New)
Nicole Yohalem and Alicia Wilson-Ahlstrom with Sean Fischer and Marybeth Shinn
Quality assessment tools for afterschool programs are important for policymakers wanting to make sure funds are allocated to programs likely to have an impact and succeed. Assessment tools are also important at the practice level because they help practitioners mark what effective practices look like and allow them to assess and improve on their programs. This guide was designed to compare the purpose, structure, content, and technical properties of several youth program quality assessment tools. This resource provides useful guidance to practitioners, policymakers, researchers, and evaluators on what tools are available and under what conditions they would be most appropriate. (83 pages)
© 2007
Web Resourcehttp://www.forumfyi.org/files/Measuring_Youth_Program_Quality.pdf
The Forum for Youth Investment
7064 Eastern Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20011
Phone: 202-207-3333
Fax: 202-207-3329
Web: http://www.forumfyi.org

Message Matters: Succeeding at the Crossroads of Mission and Market (New)
Rebecca K. Leet
The technology of today allows us to provide information quickly, but we still need to deliver content that will resonate with our audience if we are to be successful. Although this book is aimed at medium- to large-sized organizations, it is still applicable to all. The author emphasizes the strategic message and provides a five-step method for producing one. A case study is also included, as well as appendixes on organizational needs assessment and organizational readiness assessment. (150 pages)
© 2007
Print$26.95
Fieldstone Alliance
60 Plato Blvd. E, Ste. 150
St. Paul, MN 55107
Phone: 800-274-6024
Web: http://www.fieldstonealliance.org

Mini-Digest of Education Statistics, 2006 (New)
Thomas D. Snyder
The Mini-Digest of Education Statistics, 2006 is a pocket-sized reference for the statistical information found in much greater detail in the Digest of Education Statistics, 2006. This compilation highlights data such as enrollment rates, teachers' salaries, academic performance, and expenditures. Results of many surveys by the National Center for Education Statistics are included as well. (75 pages)
© 2007
Web Resourcehttp://nces.ed.gov/pubs2007/2007067.pdf
National Center for Education Statistics
Institute of Education Sciences
U.S. Department of Education
1990 K St. NW
Washington, DC 20006-5651
Phone: 202-502-7300
Web: http://www.nces.ed.gov

Mobilizing for Evidence-Based Character Education (New)
U.S. Department of Education
Federal grants help schools organize and implement character education. With these funds, however, come several mandates. Under No Child Left Behind, schools must demonstrate that the program receiving the grant has clear objectives based on scientifically based research and undergo several periodic evaluations. Program staff involved in these rigorous evaluations may lack the knowledge necessary to assess the outcomes of character education. Many are also unfamiliar with evaluation vocabulary and the process and requirements of the Institutional Review Board. This resource helps project directors learn more about the scientific evaluation process. It provides eight steps to guide the director through planning and implementing. Appendixes present information on federal regulations, sample consent letters in English and Spanish, a checklist of evaluation activities, examples for displaying data, and a glossary of evaluation terminology. (72 pages)
© 2007
Web Resourcehttp://www.ed.gov/programs/charactered/mobilizing.pdf
ED Pubs, Education Publications Center
U.S. Department of Education
P.O. Box 1398
Jessup, MD 20794-1398
Phone: 877-433-7827
Fax: 301-470-1244
E-mail: edpubs@inet.ed.gov
Web: http://www.ed.gov

More One-Hour Mysteries (New)
Mary Ann Carr
In this follow-up to Carr's popular book One-Hour Mysteries, students are introduced to five more mysteries that require them to reason deductively, draw inferences, take notes, and organize data to successfully analyze the evidence. The book provides complete instructions for the teacher as well as reproducible pages for the students listing the clues and data needed to solve the crimes. (64 pages)
© 2005
Print$11.95
Prufrock Press, Inc.
P.O. Box 8813
Waco, TX 76701
Phone: 800-998-2208
Fax: 800-240-0333
Web: http://www.prufrock.com

More Than Homework, a Snack, and Basketball: Afterschool Programs as an Oasis of Hope for Black Parents in Four Cities (New)
Gerald Robinson and Leslie Fenwick
This resource reports the results of a study about Black parents who have children enrolled in an afterschool program. Four general themes emerged from the parent responses: barriers to afterschool programs, parents' knowledge of afterschool programs, the quality of afterschool programs, and the power of focus groups. Findings of this study include what Black parents believe is the purpose of an afterschool program, what they expect from an afterschool program, what they think makes an afterschool program weak or strong, and what activities their children like and dislike. (12 pages)
© 2007
Web Resourcehttp://www.scoter.baeo.org/news_multi_media/mottSummary.pdf
Black Alliance for Educational Options
1710 Rhode Island Ave. NW
Floor 12
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202-429-2236
Fax: 202-429-2237
Web: http://www.baeo.org

More Than Just Talk: English Language Learning in Afterschool (New)
Center for Afterschool & Community Education
This resource provides techniques and activities for working with English language learners in grades K–12. It assists afterschool professionals in creating a supportive learning environment and in encouraging students to develop their English language skills. Detailed plans for staff training and tools for customizing the materials are also included. (132 pages)
© 2007
Print and CD-ROM$39.95
Center for Afterschool & Community Education
Moorestown West Corporate Center
2 Executive Dr., Ste. 4
Moorestown, NJ 08057
Phone: 856-533-2702
Fax: 856-533-2701
Web: http://www.afterschooled.org

Motivating Underachievers, Revised Expanded Edition (New)
Carolyn Coil
Underachievement can manifest itself in various ways in students and is often used as an umbrella term to describe many types of problems. The focus of this book, however, is on those students who have a significant discrepancy between their potential and their achievement. With 220 strategies, this revised and expanded edition aims to provide parents and educators with resources to promote growth and achievement in these students. The areas of building self-esteem, improving study skills, remediating academic weaknesses, and providing motivation are targeted. The author also offers practical strategies as well as reproducible resources for each area, and each strategy is numbered for easy reference. Sections on working with parents of underachievers and facilitating change and flexibility within the school system are also included. (112 pages)
© 2001
Print$16.95
Pieces of Learning
1990 Market Rd.
Marion, IL 62959
Phone: 800-729-5137
Fax: 800-844-0455
Web: http://www.piecesoflearning.com

No Child Left Behind: Primer (New)
Frederick M. Hess and Michael J. Petrilli
Signed into law in 2002, No Child Left Behind (NCLB) has greatly influenced the American educational system. The purpose of this book is to explain NCLB more completely by taking a comprehensive look at its elements, including its history, its implementation, and the challenges it has brought about. This is a helpful resource for someone seeking to get a better understanding of NCLB, as it covers the pertinent information in a concise, straightforward format. Important words in the text are bolded and explained further in notes located in the margins of the pages, and the information is organized and presented clearly. (152 pages)
© 2007
Print$18.95
Peter Lang Publishing, Inc.
29 Broadway, 18th Floor
New York, NY 10006
Phone: 800-770-5264
Fax: 212-647-7707
Web: http://www.peterlang.com

NSACA Standards for Quality School-Age Care
National AfterSchool Association
This resource describes the National School-Age Care Alliance practices that lead to quality programs for young people ages 5–14 in their out-of-school time. The manual is a result of the field-testing and observation of hundreds of practitioners and is the basis of the National AfterSchool Association program improvement and accreditation system. The 144 standards are organized into 36 keys to quality. The resource includes more than 400 examples to illustrate the standards and a questionnaire to help programs determine when they are ready to move toward program self-study and accreditation. (98 pages)
© 1998
Print$15.00
National AfterSchool Association
529 Main St., Ste. 214
Charlestown, MA 02129
Phone: 800-617-8242
Fax: 617-778-6020
E-mail: staff@naaweb.org
Web: http://www.naaweb.org

One-Hour Mysteries
Mary Ann Carr
The five mysteries in this book provide an opportunity to build thinking skills in a motivating context. The mysteries, which include robberies, blackmail, sabotage, and murder, are appropriate for children in grades 4–8, and each mystery includes complete instructions for program staff and reproducible pages that outline the mystery and supply clues until the culprit is found. Student detectives investigate suspects and their alibis and motives. In addition to using deductive reasoning skills, students take notes, organize data, and analyze evidence in a classroom forensic lab. (64 pages)
© 2005
Print$12.95
Prufrock Press
P.O. Box 8813
Waco, TX 76714
Phone: 800-998-2208
Fax: 800-240-0333
Web: http://www.prufrock.com

Our Iceberg Is Melting: Changing and Succeeding Under Any Conditions (New)
John Kotter and Holger Rathgeber
This is a book about major, life-altering change. Using penguins as main characters in the story, the book tells a tale of overcoming seemingly impossible obstacles and working together to effect necessary change. The penguins experience conflict, resistance, fear, and later the crucial decision-making process that will determine whether they will succeed as a group despite their melting iceberg. The book presents deep issues in a unique and entertaining way. Wonderful illustrations and large text add to the atypical form and charm of the text. Readers may see themselves as the penguins and, through their story, may develop into better leaders, family members, and community helpers. (147 pages)
© 2006
Print$19.95
St. MartinÕs Press
175 Fifth Ave.
New York, NY 10010
,
Phone: 212-674-6132
Web: http://www.stmartins.com

Our Roots, Our Future: Affirming Culture and Language in After School and Youth Programs
Jhumpa Bhattacharya, Ann Jaramillo, Lisette Lopez, Laurie Olsen, Amy Scharf, and Mona Shah
This resource is designed for directors and staff of afterschool and youth development programs. The book includes a framework for understanding the key cultural, linguistic, and racial issues that afterschool providers face; success stories from five afterschool sites that affirm culture and language in their program design; comments from youth on the importance of culture, language, and community in their lives; and tools that you can use in your program. Our Roots, Our Future offers strategies for working with and supporting immigrants and young people of all cultures. (112 pages)
© 2002
Print$14.95
California Tomorrow
1904 Franklin St., Ste. 300
Oakland, CA 94612
Phone: 510-496-0220
Fax: 510-496-0225
Web: http://www.californiatomorrow.org

Out-of-School Time Evaluation Snapshot: Measurement Tools for Evaluating Out-of-School Time Programs: An Evaluation Resource (New)
Christopher Wilmer, Suzanne Bouffard, and Priscilla Little
This resource describes the academic, youth development, and prevention performance measures currently being used by out-of-school time programs to assess their progress and demonstrate results. It lists data sources for these measures and provides bibliographic citations, Internet links, and sample items from the different instruments. Practitioners can use this resource to help find an evaluation instrument that matches their program and needs. (29 pages)
© 2006
Web Resourcehttp://www.hfrp.org/publications-resources/publications-series/out-of-school-time-evaluation-snapshots/measurement-tools-for-evaluating-out-of-school-time-programs-an-evaluation-resource
Harvard Family Research Project
Harvard Graduate School of Education
3 Garden St.
Cambridge, MA 02138
Phone: 617-495-9108
Fax: 617-495-8594
E-mail: hfrp@gse.harvard.edu
Web: http://www.hfrp.org

Outcomes Linked to High-Quality Afterschool Programs: Longitudinal Findings From the Study of Promising Afterschool Programs (New)
Deborah Lowe Vandell, Elizabeth R. Reisner, and Kim M. Pierce
This resource reports the findings of a 2-year study that followed almost 3,000 low-income, ethnically diverse elementary and middle school students from eight states. About half of the students attended high-quality afterschool programs. The researchers found that regular participation in high-quality afterschool programs was linked to significant gains in standardized test scores and work habits as well as reductions in behavior problems among the disadvantaged students. (9 pages)
© 2007
Web Resourcehttp://www.policystudies.com/studies/youth/Promising%20Practices.html
Policy Studies Associates, Inc.
1718 Connecticut Ave. NW, Ste. 400
Washington, DC 20009
Phone: 202-939-9780
Fax: 202-939-5732
Web: http://www.policystudies.com

Partners in Learning: From Conflict to Collaboration in Secondary Classrooms
Carol Miller Lieber
This resource assists secondary teachers in supporting the cognitive and social-emotional development of their students. The author presents 10 core practices that enable students and teachers to work together to achieve learning goals. This practical guide contains a chapter on classroom management and discipline and instructions for arranging classrooms to support these practices Also provided is a detailed plan for student orientation, community building, and course content for the first 30 days of school. Hundreds of activities and tips are included. (344 pages)
© 2002
Print$38.00
Educators for Social Responsibility
23 Garden St.
Cambridge, MA 02138
Phone: 800-370-2515
Fax: 617-864-5164
Web: http://www.esrnational.org

Partnerships by Design: Cultivating Effective and Meaningful School-Family-Community Partnerships
Debbie Ellis and Kendra Hughes
This resource helps schools and programs assess their current approaches to family and community involvement and implement more effective strategies. It provides easy-to-read information and forms, activities, and worksheets to facilitate planning and building more effective and meaningful school-family-community partnerships. This guide is a practical, realistic tool for efficient planning processes. (56 pages)
© 2002
Web Resourcehttp://www.nwrel.org/partnerships/cloak/booklet-one.pdf
School-Family-Community Partnerships Team
Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory
101 SW Main St., Ste. 500
Portland, OR 97204-3213
Phone: 503-275-9487
Web: http://www.nwrel.org

Perfect Phrases for Dealing With Difficult People (New)
Susan F. Benjamin
In a leadership or management role, one may encounter a rainbow of personalities, some of which may challenge the guidelines of patience and professionalism. Creating a harmonious environment, especially when children are involved, is paramount. Learning to deal with staff members' personalities greatly increases chances of success for any program. Readers will learn to diffuse tense situations, motivate unproductive staff, and deal with discord by presenting mutually beneficial solutions.
© 2008
Print$9.95
McGraw Hill
Two Penn Plaza
New York, NY 10121-2298
Web: http://www.mhprofessional.com

Planning a Program Evaluation and Planning a Program Evaluation Worksheet
Ellen Taylor-Powell, Sara Steele, and Mohammad Douglah
This guide, organized into four major sections, helps groups plan program evaluations. The first section covers topics such as the purpose, target audience, and need for the evaluation. The second section discusses sources of information and data-collection methods. The third section addresses how the data will be analyzed, interpreted, and communicated to others. The final section examines time lines, the division of responsibilities, and budgets. Each section presents a series of questions and considerations for you to adapt to your own program needs and situations. The four-page worksheet describes each of the major sections of the guide and enables you to complete the information as it relates to your particular program evaluation. (31 pages)
© 1996
Guide$2.00
Worksheet$1.00
Web Resourcehttp://www.uwex.edu/ces/pdande/evaluation/evaldocs.html
Cooperative Extension Publications
University of Wisconsin
45 N. Charter St.
Madison, WI 53715
Phone: 877-947-7827

Problem-Based Learning for Math & Science: Integrating Inquiry and the Internet, Second Edition (New)
Diana L. Ronis
The ability to effectively and quickly solve problems leads to academic success. This resource emphasizes critical thinking, resourcefulness, and self-reliance. The text also incorporates new technology in researching the latest scientific developments and supplementing math instruction. The author presents projects that incorporate Internet research and develop skills of observation, critique, and theorization. In today's "information society," classroom learning may use the innumerable free resources available through the Internet. This guide provides ways to integrate such learning into current teaching practices and discusses how to evaluate student success. (176 pages)
© 2008
Print$27.95
Corwin Press
2455 Teller Rd.
Thousand Oaks, CA 91320
Phone: 800-233-9936
Fax: 800-417-2466
Web: http://www.corwinpress.com

Program Evaluation: Forms and Approaches, Third Edition (New)
John M. Owen
This resource provides recent research on evaluation and includes timely examples from worldwide sources. The text provides a comprehensive and useful overview of the evaluation process in a variety of settings, including the educational setting. The comparisons offer help in choosing and tailoring the appropriate techniques for any program. In addition, the book describes and presents examples based on the five major forms of evaluative inquiry: proactive, clarificative, interactive, monitoring, and impact. This edition includes a chapter on evaluation management and additional sections discussing negotiation theory, evidence-based practice, performance auditing and management, and realistic evaluation. (298 pages)
© 2007
Print$38.00
The Guilford Press
72 Spring St.
New York, NY 10012
Phone: 800-365-7006
Web: http://www.guilford.com

Promoting Physical Activity and Healthy Nutrition in Afterschool Settings: Strategies for Program Leaders and Policy Makers (New)
Afterschool Investments Project
This resource discusses the role afterschool programs can play in the prevention of childhood obesity. Specifically, it discusses how these programs can reach those most at risk, including minorities and those in poverty; how they can reach children at a time of day when they would normally be inactive; and how they can provide nutritious meals and snacks that can serve as good dietary examples. It also provides examples of how these ideas have been applied at the federal, state, and local levels. The three major areas addressed are (1) incorporating physical activity and nutrition into afterschool programming; (2) using policy levers to build provider capacity and facilitate the afterschool community's involvement in policy discussions; and (3) accessing resources and developing financing strategies. (30 pages)
© 2006
Web Resourcehttp://www.nccic.acf.hhs.gov/afterschool/fitness_nutrition.pdf
The Finance Project (Afterschool Investments)
1401 New York Ave. NW, Ste. 800
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-628-4200
Fax: 202-628-1293
E-mail: info@financeproject.org
Web: http://www.nccic.org/afterschool/

Pursuing the Promise: Addressing Equity, Access and Diversity in After School and Youth Programs
California Tomorrow
This research report focuses on information and resources that look at equity, access, and diversity trends in the afterschool field. The report lays out a framework for the research design. It discusses research findings in three areas: afterschool programs in the context of diversity; program-level understandings, strategies, and challenges; and community and policy-level understandings, strategies, and challenges. The report also offers recommendations for pursuing equity and diversity issues in the afterschool field, along with commentaries by youth, parents, program staff, and policymakers about the importance of afterschool programs. The report has a resource section, and the appendix describes the research methodology and survey instrument used in the research. (140 pages)
© 2003
Print$14.95
California Tomorrow
1904 Franklin St., Ste. 300
Oakland, CA 94612
Phone: 510-496-0220, ext. 310
Fax: 510-496-0225
Web: http://www.californiatomorrow.org

Quality Time After School: What Instructors Can Do to Enhance Learning (New)
Jean Grossman, Margo Campbell, and Becca Raley
This resource examines what makes afterschool activities engaging, detailing key characteristics linked to youth engagement and learning and providing instructors with a road map for how to create successful learning environments. The authors explore what conditions lead youth to want to attend the activity, what aspects of an afterschool activity engage youth, and what conditions lead youngsters to feel they have learned in an activity. (64 pages)
© 2007
Print$7.50
Web Resourcehttp://www.ppv.org/ppv/youth/youth_publications.asp?section_id=8#pub217
Public/Private Ventures
2000 Market St., Ste. 600
Philadelphia, PA 19103
Phone: 215-557-4400
Fax: 202-557-4469
Web: http://www.ppv.org

Questionnaire Design: Asking Questions With a Purpose
Ellen Taylor-Powell
This resource assists in constructing an evaluation questionnaire and in completing an analysis of the type of data you want to collect from your questionnaire. In doing this, it examines knowledge, beliefs, attitudes, opinions, behaviors, and attributes. The publication offers advice on how to word questions and discusses the most effective questions to elicit the responses and data you need. The guide also shows how to most appropriately format and pretest a questionnaire. The appendix provides additional information on how to request attribute information (age, income, etc.). (20 pages)
© 1998
Print$3.00
Web Resourcehttp://www.uwex.edu/ces/pdande/evaluation/evaldocs.html
Cooperative Extension Publications
University of Wisconsin
45 N. Charter St.
Madison, WI 53715
Phone: 877-947-7827

Resolving Conflicts at Work: Eight Strategies for Everyone on the Job, Revised Edition
Kenneth Cloke and Joan Goldsmith
This book offers numerous suggestions for transforming workplace conflict into opportunities for positive change and maps out eight paths to hone conflict-resolution skills. Examples of these paths include listening with your heart, embracing and acknowledging emotions, separating what matters from what's in the way, solving problems creatively and collaboratively, and learning from difficult behaviors. This new edition includes case studies that will lead the reader to a better understanding of the issues that drive conflicts and how to improve working relationships. (384 pages)
© 2005
Print$17.95
Jossey-Bass
989 Market St.
San Francisco, CA 94103-1741
Phone: 800-956-7739
Fax: 415-433-0499
Web: http://www.josseybass.com

Respect Matters (New)
R. E. Myers
Respect is something we want all children to learn, but how do you teach it? Respect Matters includes 25 real-life scenarios appropriate for students in grades 6–8. Each scenario exposes students to a situation that pertains to the issue of respect, followed by a set of questions and a related activity. There are several ways in which this resource can be used. The scenarios can be powerful discussion starters to create opportunities for students to examine the situation more deeply as a class. In addition, the format of the stories and questions allows the teacher to reproduce them for student use, which makes them great for independent or group work. Because each scenario is unique, they can be presented in any order, and many of them can be easily integrated into science or social studies lessons. "For the Teacher" sections at the conclusion of each scenario help educators lead meaningful discussions and activities about an important topic that impacts us all. (140 pages)
© 2006
Print$15.95
Good Year Books
P.O. Box 91858
Tucson, AZ 85752-1858
Phone: 888-511-1530
Fax: 888-511-1501
Web: http://www.goodyearbooks.com

Response to Intervention: A Practical Guide for Every Teacher (New)
William N. Bender and Cara Shores
This resource is intended as a practical guide for educators who are implementing the Response to Intervention (RTI) procedure. The most influential studies in RTI are discussed but only as a touch point for better understanding of RTI procedures. Examples of these procedures are presented as well as where and how educators can save time in implementing this new individual instructing and monitoring process. Topics include implementation of a standard treatment protocol, implementation of problem-solving, and meeting the needs of all learners. (147 pages)
© 2007
Print$27.95
Corwin Press
2455 Teller Rd.
Thousand Oaks, CA 91320
Phone: 800-233-9936
Fax: 800-417-2466
Web: http://www.corwinpress.com

Round Table Geometry: 30 Activities to Connect Math and Literature (New)
Elena Dworkin Wright and Susan Shapero
This resource, which builds on Sir Cumference and the First Round Table by Cindy Neuchwander, makes connections between literature and mathematics, focusing on geometric concepts. Several problem-solving strategies, such as drawing a picture, considering alternatives, looking at other designs and solutions in nature, and analyzing outcomes, are incorporated into the 30 activities in this book. The activities also use many critical-thinking strategies such as classifying, sequencing, and discovering relationships.
© 2007
Web Resourcehttp://www.charlesbridge.com/school/pdf/roundtablemasters.pdf
Charlesbridge Publishing
85 Main St.
Watertown, MA 02472
Phone: 800-225-3214
Fax: 800-926-5775
Web: http://www.charlesbridge.com

Sampling
Ellen Taylor-Powell
This evaluation resource provides guidance on conducting sampling. It first addresses whether sampling is an appropriate evaluation tool for a particular program. Then it presents sampling for generalizability, or probability sampling, and talks about specific sampling strategies, including simple random sampling, systematic sampling, and stratified sampling. The resource also explores sampling for other purposes, or non-probability sampling, including quota sampling and purposeful sampling. The appendixes list references, a table of random numbers, and recommended sample sizes. (12 pages)
© 1998
Print$2.00
Web Resourcehttp://www.uwex.edu/ces/pdande/evaluation/evaldocs.html
Cooperative Extension Publications
University of Wisconsin
45 N. Charter St.
Madison, WI 53715
Phone: 877-947-7827

School-Age Care Environment Rating Scale
Thelma Harms, Ellen Wineberg Jacobs, and Donna Romano White
The School-Age Care Environment Rating Scale (SACERS) helps define high-quality care for school-age children and assess levels of quality of care in school-age programs. SACERS consists of 49 assessment items organized into seven categories: space and furnishings, health and safety, activities, interactions, program structure, staff development, and supplementary items for children with special needs. SACERS can be used by afterschool program staff for self-assessment, by directors as a program-quality measure for planning program improvement, by agency staff for monitoring, by staff development programs, or by parents concerned about quality care for their children. The scale is particularly useful for research and program evaluation of school-age programs. (168 pages)
© 1996
Scale and Training Guide$16.95
Scoring Sheets Package$8.95
Teachers College Press
P.O. Box 20
Williston, VT 05495-0020
Phone: 800-575-6566
Fax: 802-864-7626
Web: http://www.teacherscollegepress.com

School-Age Ideas and Activities for After-School Programs, Second Edition Revised (New)
Karen Haas-Foletta, Michele Cogley, and Lori Ottolini Geno
This resource is an updated edition of a classic. All 125 activities have been test-driven in afterschool settings and involve learning in creative and innovative ways. Art exercises incorporate various media and imaginative combinations, and some, like root beer candles, have practical uses. Each activity stimulates the senses with different textures, tastes, smells, and sounds. Instructions are clear, concise, and manageable in their simplicity. Supplemental sections on professional growth and development, behavioral guidance, and effective communication enhance this resource. (224 pages)
© 2005
Print$20.95
School-Age Notes
P.O. Box 476
New Albany, OH 43054
Phone: 800-410-8780
Web: http://www.schoolagenotes.com

Selected Evaluation Terms
Priscilla Little
Evaluation terminology can be confusing at times. This resource provides commonly accepted definitions for terms used in the out-of-school-time field. It also discusses the difference between performance measurement and program evaluation, the difference between quantitative and qualitative data, and the main features and tradeoffs in study-design choices. (5 pages)
© 2002
Web Resourcehttp://www.hfrp.org/publications-resources/browse-our-publications/selected-evaluation-terms
Harvard Family Research Project
Harvard Graduate School of Education
3 Garden St.
Cambridge, MA 02138
Phone: 617-495-9108
Fax: 617-495-8594
E-mail: hfrp@gse.harvard.edu
Web: http://www.hfrp.org

Setting the Stage for a Youth Development Associate Credential: A National Review of Professional Credentials for the Out-of-School Time Workforce (New)
Julie Dennehy, Ellen Gannett, and Rachel Robbins
Demands for services in the out-of-school-time field have increased dramatically in recent years. This has brought attention to the need for appropriate training and preparation for these staff in order to improve the overall quality of afterschool and youth programs. The authors review the research conducted by the National Institute on Out-of-School Time on the effectiveness of credentials, which are defined as "certifications that recognize an individual's performance based on a set of defined skills and knowledge" (p. 5). A decision of the Youth Development Associate credential, is also provided. The appendix includes selected case studies of other credential programs available and a matrix of common credential requirements. (46 pages)
© 2006
Web Resourcehttp://www.cornerstones4kids.org/images/youth_devel_setting_606.pdf
Cornerstones for Kids
One Greenway Plaza, Ste. 550
Houston, TX 77046
Phone: 713-627-2322
Fax: 713-627-3006
E-mail: info@cornerstones4kids.org
Web: http://www.cornerstones4kids.org

Snapshots of Sustainability: Profiles of Successful Strategies for Financing Out-of-School Time Programs (New)
Kate Sandel
Everyone faces difficulty finding ways to sustain operations. This document provides profiles of 32 successful out-of-school initiatives as well as lessons learned. Although some community characteristics impact the ability of the programs to be successful, the reader can easily pull out examples that can be transferred or applied in other locations. The final section includes additional resources concerning funding and sustaining out-of-school programs.
© 2007
Print$20.00
Web Resourcehttp://www.financeproject.org/Publications/SustainabilityProfilesOST.pdf
The Finance Project
1401 New York Ave., Ste. 800
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-628-4200
Fax: 202-628-1293
E-mail: info@financeproject.org
Web: http://www.financeproject.org

Strengths Finder 2.0 (New)
Tom Rath
Discover your top five strengths through the innovative process described in this resource. This book provides motivation to understand your strengths and use your personal talent in the workplace. It offers scientifically proven assessment techniques for individuals, programs, and teams. It also provides ways to apply strengths and talents productively. Through careful analysis, the book takes clichŽs and breaks them down into practical starting points for self-evaluation. Readers define their strengths or the strengths of their program, further defining the specific roles on which to focus and excel. An interactive CD-ROM and Web site access accompany the text. (175 pages)
© 2007
Print and CD-ROM$19.95
Gallup Press
1251 Avenue of the Americas, 23rd Floor
New York, NY 10020
Web: http://www.galluppress.com

Successful Program Evaluation (New)
Michael K. Wells
Successful Program Evaluation is designed to help grant writers create strong evaluation sections of proposals that may make the difference between getting funded or not. Helpful information is provided on topics such as what funders want, developing an evaluation plan, writing the evaluation section, and evaluation instruments. In addition, a chapter on resources and a comprehensive glossary are included. A well-developed and well-written program evaluation can strengthen an entire grant proposal. With this book, grant writers will have the tools necessary to take their grant development strategies to the next level. (142 pages)
© 2007
Print$29.95
Portland State University
School of Extended Studies
Continuing Education Press
P.O. Box 1394
Portland, OR 97207-1394
Phone: 866-647-7377
Fax: 503-725-4715
Web: http://www.cep.pdx.edu/titles/program_evaluation

Summer Program Tips, Strategies & Activities for School-Agers 5–14 Years Old
Rich Scofield, Editor
Summer programming differs greatly from that of the rest of the year. This resource is a compilation of the best summer program ideas and activities published over the last 20 years in the School-Age Notes newsletter. These ideas and activities are grouped into such chapters as "Getting Ready for Summer," "Planning the Program," "Marketing the Summer Program," "Model Summer Programs," "Field Trips and Summer Safety," and "Activities." Specific articles, tips, and strategies on everything from hiring and training summer staff to retaining older kids in a summer program are also included. (144 pages)
© 2001
Print$15.95
School-Age Notes
P.O. Box 476
New Albany, OH 43054
Phone: 800-410-8780
Web: http://www.gryphonhouse.com/store/trans/productDetailForm.asp?BookID=11416

Sustainability in School-linked Afterschool Programs (New)
Policy Studies Associates, Inc.
This report focuses on program leadership and program quality. These areas were emphasized due to results of a previous research study conducted by Policy Studies Associates, Inc. Part 1 of this report describes strategies for managing external partnerships and attracting and using diverse resources. It also provides an overview of policy implications. Part 2 addresses afterschool programs' content, recruitment and retention of high-quality staff, collaboration and coordination with stakeholders, and demonstration of success. (35 pages)
© 2002
Web Resourcehttp://www.policystudies.com/studies/youth/FINAL%20Issue%20Brief%20Nov2002WEB.pdf
Policy Studies Associates, Inc.
1718 Connecticut Ave. NW, Ste. 400
Washington, DC 20009
Phone: 202-939-9780
Fax: 202-939-5732
Web: http://www.policystudies.com

Sustaining 21st Century Community Learning Centers: What Works for Programs and How Policymakers Can Help (New)
Amanda Szekely and Heather Clapp Padgette
The is a research brief on sustainability of programs funded by the U.S. Department of Education's 21st Century Community Learning Centers (21st CCLC) program as the first rounds of state-administered grants expired. The goal of the research was to better understand what contributed to or hindered the sustainability of 21st CCLC programs. The programs operated in rural and urban communities nationwide and had varying degrees of local support. All continue to offer varying degrees of out-of-school-time programming. (8 pages)
© 2006
Print$15.00
Web Resourcehttp://76.12.61.196/publications/sustaining_21cclc.pdf
The Finance Project
1401 New York Ave. NW, Ste. 800
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-628-4200
Fax: 202-628-1293
E-mail: info@financeproject.org
Web: http://www.financeproject.org

Tapestry of Tales: Stories of Self, Family, and Community Provide Rich Fabric for Learning (New)
Amy Stuczynski, Joyce Riha Linik, Rebecca Novick, Jean Spraker, Patti Tucci, and Debbie Ellis
This resource provides information on how teachers of students of all ages can use stories to bring students' narrative voices into the classroom, enrich teaching and learning by tapping into students' lives, engage and motivate students to write, and reinforce reading, writing, speaking, listening, and thinking connections and competencies. This resource contains a literature review on the importance of personal, family, and community stories and examples describing projects that classroom teachers have implemented. (314 pages)
© 2005
Print$29.05
Web Resourcehttp://www.nwrel.org/tapestry
Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory
101 SW Main St., Ste. 500
Portland, OR 97204-3213
Phone: 800-547-6339 or 503-275-9500
E-mail: info@nwrel.org
Web: http://www.nwrel.org

Teaching Children With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Instructional Strategies and Practices (New)
U.S. Department of Education
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) affects many students in our schools today. These children suffer from inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity, which affects them academically as well as socially. This resource for teachers provides pertinent information centered around three components of a successful program for children with ADHD: academic instruction, behavioral interventions, and classroom accommodations. Ideas are given for conducting lessons, organizing study skills, effective behavioral intervention techniques, the physical learning environment, and more. The instructional strategies outlined in this booklet will help teachers improve the academic performance and behavior of students with ADHD. (26 pages)
© 2006
Web Resourcehttp://www.ed.gov/rschstat/research/pubs/adhd/adhd-teaching-2006.pdf
ED Pubs, Education Publications Center
U.S. Department of Education
P.O. Box 1398
Jessup, MD 20794-1398
Phone: 877-433-7827
Fax: 301-470-1244
E-mail: edpubs@inet.ed.gov
Web: http://www.ed.gov

Teaching Mathematics to Middle School Students With Learning Difficulties (New)
Marjorie Montague and Asha K. Jitendra
This book is a useful resource for practitioners. The material is designed to ensure that youngsters with learning difficulties can assess and master the intricacies of middle school mathematics. Instructional and assessment procedures, adaptations and modifications, and guidelines for evaluating instruction so practitioners can improve their current approach to teaching mathematics are presented.
© 2006
Print$25.00
The Guilford Press
A Division of Guilford Publications, Inc.
72 Spring St.
New York, NY 10012
Phone: 800-365-7006
Fax: 212-966-6708
Web: http://www.guilford.com

Teaching the Fun of Science
Janice VanCleave
This resource provides opportunities to engage students ages 9–12 in investigations. Using a hands-on approach, students work to understand science concepts, apply the concepts, and reinforce the skills needed to conduct independent investigations. The book is divided into four sections on the scientific method and the three different branches of science (physical, life, and Earth). Teaching the Fun of Science includes 75 different investigations; appendixes on the graduated cylinder, the thermometer, and scientific supply sources; a glossary; and an index. (208 pages)
© 2001
Print$19.95
Jossey-Bass
10475 Crosspoint Blvd.
Indianapolis, IN 46256
Phone: 877-762-2974
Fax: 800-597-3299
Web: http://www.josseybass.com

Teambuilding That Gets Results (New)
Linda Eve Diamond and Harriet Diamond
This resource provides team-building strategies and activities. Exercises serve long- or short-term goals and come with clear instructions, tips, and helpful anecdotes. The team-building activities help build leadership skills, increase efficiency, boost morale, and encourage camaraderie. The authors discuss problematic topics such as how to delegate leadership roles, culture clashes, long-distance team-building, and communication. (249 pages)
© 2007
Print$16.95
Sourcebooks, Inc.
1935 Brookdale Rd., Ste. 139
Naperville, IL 60563
Phone: 630-961-3900
Fax: 630-961-2168
Web: http://www.sourcebooks.com

Teambuilding With Teens: Activities for Leadership, Decision Making, & Group Success (New)
Mariam G. MacGregor
Learning about leadership and building character will be meaningful and fun with these 36 activities designed for grades 6–12. The easy-to-use activities arranged by topics and learning concepts can be readily used as part of a character education, conflict resolution, service learning, or leadership program. Each activity takes 20–45 minutes. Background information, material lists, step-by-step instructions, and discussion questions are provided for each activity. Included with the book is a CD-ROM containing all of the reproducible forms for the activities. This resource is ideal for teaching teamwork in an afterschool program. (186 pages)
© 2008
Print and CD-ROM$34.95
Free Spirit Publishing
217 Fifth Ave. N, Ste. 200
Minneapolis, MN 55401-1299
Phone: 800-735-7323
Fax: 866-419-5199
Web: http://www.freespirit.com

The ABCs of Evaluation: Timeless Techniques for Program and Project Managers, Second Edition (Revised)
John Boulmetis and Phyllis Dutwin
This updated resource shows how to select participants for an evaluation and how to deal with multiple goals and objectives, including those of an organization, its staff, and the client. The book describes different evaluation models, illustrates the circumstances under which each model can be used, and offers tips on identifying data sources and collecting data. Charts, graphs, models, and lists throughout the book help organize, extend, and facilitate the understanding of each evaluation concept. The authors, both professional educators and trainers, untangle the complexity of the evaluation process in a practical, accessible guide. (239 pages)
© 2006
Print$40.00
Jossey-Bass
989 Market St.
San Francisco, CA 94103-1741
Phone: 800-956-7739
Fax: 415-433-0499
Web: http://www.josseybass.com

The Art of Talking to Anyone (New)
Rosalie Maggio
Effective communication can determine the success of an afterschool program. This resource provides sample scripts for almost any scenario, from casually talking on the phone to conflict resolution. The author includes tips for how to be a good listener, keep a conversation going, and be persuasive and also provides useful information for a variety of social situations. Topics range from talking with family and friends to helping someone in a troubling time. (221 pages)
© 2005
Print$16.95
McGraw-Hill Professional
Two Penn Plaza
New York, NY 10121-2298
Web: http://www.mhprofessional.com

The Condition of Education 2007 in Brief (New)
U.S. Department of Education
This resource contains a sample of the 48 indicators provided in The Condition of Education 2007, part of a congressionally mandated report that provides an annual statistical portrait of education in the United States. This compilation is broken down into five sections: participation in education; learner outcomes; student effort and educational progress; contexts of elementary and secondary education; and contexts of postsecondary education. (26 pages)
© 2007
Web Resourcehttp://www.nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/
U.S. Department of Education
ED Pubs
P.O. Box 1398
Jessup, MD 20794-1398
Phone: 877-4ED-PUBS
Web: http://www.edpubs.org

The Costs of Out-of-School-Time Programs: A Review of the Available Evidence (New)
Christianne Lind, Nanette Relave, Sharon Deich, Jean Grossman, and Andrew Gersick
Have you wondered about the cost of high-quality out-of-school-time programs or the cost of improving an existing program? This resource reviews the literature on this topic and provides key findings on various costs (startup, operating, capital, and infrastructure or system-building). Cost data from out-of-school-time program studies is included as well as a bibliography of resources on costs and quality. (28 pages)
© 2006
Web Resourcehttp://www.financeproject.org/publications/litreview.pdf
The Finance Project
1401 New York Ave. NW, Ste. 800
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-628-4200
Fax: 202-628-1293
E-mail: info@financeproject.org
Web: http://www.financeproject.org

The Jossey-Bass Reader on Educational Leadership, Second Edition (New)
Jossey-Bass Publishers
This is an anthology of some of the best literature available on leadership in education, including educational theory in leadership and successful practices and theory in business leadership. The book is broken into six parts. Part 1 includes five groundbreaking articles on organizational leadership, showing a strong conceptual base for leadership in all human situations. Part 2 is a theoretical look at moral leadership. Part 3 tackles the dilemma of how to go about making change in organizational cultures by understanding change and the issues involved in transformational leadership. Part 4 discusses not only setting high standards, but also using standards as strategies to improve leadership across the system. Part 5 is a discussion of leadership and diversity. Part 6 focuses on the future of leadership, including how to prepare school principals, building leadership capacity, and the ins and outs of school renewal. (472 pages)
© 2007
Print$32.00
Jossey-Bass
989 Market St.
San Francisco, CA 94103-1741
Phone: 800-956-7739
Fax: 415-433-0499
Web: http://www.josseybass.com

The Last Dropout: Stop the Epidemic! (New)
Bill Milliken
With almost one third of all high school students failing to graduate with their class, we are facing a dropout crisis. Students who drop out of high school are more likely than students who graduate to be unemployed, live in poverty, have poor health, depend on social services, or go to jail. What can schools do to help? This resource describes nine key principles proven effective by Communities In Schools, a community-based organization that helps kids succeed in school and prepare for life. The Last Dropout discusses the creation of Communities In Schools and provides stories about how the principles have been adopted into communities. Learn how a commitment to these principles can help turn around communities and make a lasting and meaningful effect on the dropout problem we are facing today. (241 pages)
© 2007
Print$14.95
Hay House, Inc.
P.O. Box 5100
Carlsbad, CA 92018-5100
Phone: 800-654-5126
Fax: 800-650-5115
Web: http://www.hayhouse.com

The Leader as Communicator: Strategies and Tactics to Build Loyalty, Focus Effort, and Spark Creativity
Robert Mai and Alan Akerson
Communication is an essential element of leadership. This resource provides an original model of the roles required of leaders in today's organizations. These roles include trust builder, critic, navigator, provocateur, learning advocate, and renewal champion. The Leader as Communicator is based on case studies from such organizations as Cadillac, Emerson, General Electric, and the U.S. Army. The publication also includes quotations from such noted authors as Peter Drucker and other experts in leadership, and it concludes with an assessment exercise that allows readers to measure their own communication skills. Anyone who wants to build effective coalitions, create enthusiasm, improve morale, and increase productivity will find this book helpful. (276 pages)
© 2003
Print$24.95
American Management Association
1601 Broadway
New York, NY 10019
Phone: 212-903-8316
Fax: 212-903-8083
Web: http://www.amanet.org/books/index.htm

The Only Grant-Writing Book You'll Ever Need, Second Edition (New)
Ellen Karsh and Arlen Sue Fox
The authors, both experienced grant writers from the public sector, interviewed a variety of funding organizations to provide thorough coverage of a complicated and misunderstood subject. The text is organized into 16 lessons, each accompanied by an anecdote and in-depth questions and answers. The authors include insightful perspectives from funders and writers and strategies only experienced grant writers can share. The appendixes include a guide to Internet resources; a list of potential grant-funding community-based foundations; 50 tips for writing a successful grant; and an exhaustive glossary of terms for grant writers. (413 pages)
© 2006
Print$18.95
Carroll & Graf Publishers
245 West 17th St., 11th Floor
New York, NY 10011-5300
Web: http://www.carrollandgraf.com

The Power of Our Words: Teacher Language That Helps Children Learn (New)
Paula Denton
Language is a powerful teaching tool; it can shape thoughts, feelings, and experiences. The words you choose to use, the pacing, and your tone of voice can all change the message you are sending. This book addresses how to use appropriate "teacher language" to bring out the best in children. Practical guidelines and concrete examples are given, as well as examples of language to avoid. Ideas on giving brief instructions, using open-ended questions, listening, and offering meaningful encouragement are just some of the topics covered. When used effectively, language can positively influence achievement and classroom management. (176 pages)
© 2007
Print$22.00
Northeast Foundation for Children, Inc.
85 Ave. A, Ste. 204
P.O. Box 718
Turners Falls, MA 01376-0718
Phone: 800-360-6332
Fax: 877-206-3952
Web: http://www.responsiveclassroom.org

The Principal's Guide to Afterschool Programs, K–8: Extending Student Learning Opportunities (New)
Anne Turnbaugh Lockwood
This book discusses how principal leaders can maximize student academic proficiency through afterschool programs, particularly for students most at risk of academic failure. Using a step-by-step process, the book guides principals through creating a successful afterschool program focused on achievement. It includes information on integrating standards, developing a parent and community base of support, hiring staff and obtaining volunteers, getting funding and grants, and collecting and evaluating program data. In addition, profiles of successful principals and programs and resources such as checklists, planning worksheets, evaluation tools, and surveys make this book very practical. (121 pages)
© 2008
Print$24.95
Corwin Press
2455 Teller Rd.
Thousand Oaks, CA 91320
Phone: 800-233-9936
Fax: 800-417-2466
Web: http://www.corwinpress.com

The Quality of School-Age Child Care in Afterschool Settings (New)
Priscilla M. Little
Afterschool programs can complement in-school learning and development. This resource identifies the characteristics of high-quality afterschool programs, examines key research linking program quality to positive developmental outcomes, and reviews current measures used in program quality assessment. The author also includes considerations for policymakers regarding program standards and a list of program quality assessment tools. (16 pages)
© 2007
Web Resourcehttp://www.researchconnections.org/location/ccrca12576
Child Care and Early Research Connections
National Center for Children in Poverty
Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health
215 W. 125th St., 3rd Floor
New York, NY 10027
Phone: 646-284-9600
Fax: 646-284-9623
E-mail: contact@researchconnections.org

The Road to Sustainability: Sustainability Workbook (New)
The National Center for Community Education with the Afterschool Alliance
This workbook provides forms and templates for designing a sustainability plan. It takes the reader through the process of creating a sustainable afterschool program and discusses the benefits of collaborations and a network map. Information on how to advocate for support, find funding, and piece together funding is also included. There is a list of Web sites and online resources for sustainability. Case studies are also included.
No Date
Web Resourcehttp://afterschoolalliance.org/funding.cfm
Afterschool Alliance
1616 H St. NW, Ste. 820
Washington, DC 20006
Phone: 202-347-2030
Fax: 202-347-2092
E-mail: info@afterschoolalliance.org
Web: http://www.afterschoolalliance.org

The Sixty-Second Guide to Working Effectively With the News Media
Independent Sector
This pocket-sized guide gives advice to staff and volunteers on building good media relations. Developed with the assistance of the executive director of the Radio and Television News Directors Foundation and the president of the National Press Foundation, the guide's topics include building relationships, pitching a story, distributing a news release, and holding a news conference. (2 pages)
No Date
Web Resourcehttp://www.independentsector.org/members/60_second_guide.html
Independent Sector
1200 18th St. NW, Ste. 200
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 888-860-8118
Fax: 301-843-0159
E-mail: info@independentsector.org
Web: http://www.independentsector.org

The Speed of Trust (New)
Stephen M. R. Covey
According to the author of this resource, the speed at which trust becomes established determines the success and strength of a relationship. The book's underlying theme states that trust is the essential component for any successful business relationship. Combined with integrity and compassion, trust establishes a leader or manager as a strong, positive influence for employees and colleagues. The book provides practical examples of how to initiate trust, build trust, and maintain that relationship. The author's insightful writing gives hope to everyone frustrated by bureaucratically driven alliances and provides tools to inspire real trust in others. (354 pages)
© 2006
Print$26.00
Free Press
A Division of Simon & Schuster, Inc.
1230 Avenue of the Americas
New York, NY 10020
Phone: 800-456-6798
Web: http://www.simonandschuster.com

The Truth About Hiring the Best (New)
Cathy Fyock
This book includes 53 truths about hiring future employees that will challenge many longstanding assumptions and conventional wisdom about selecting the best. These practical ideas and tips can help guide employers through the processes of recruiting, interviewing, evaluating, and selecting candidates who will best fit the job and who will be great for the organization's future. The truths, which are divided into seven sections, are each presented in a simple and quick format. This resource is an easy-to-read, practical guide for the busy professional who is looking for ways to improve the hiring process almost immediately. (215 pages)
© 2008
Print$18.99
PDF$13.49
FT Press
1 Lake St.
Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
Phone: 800-382-3419
Web: http://www.ftpress.com/store/product.aspx?isbn=0768668905

The Yoga Adventure for Children (New)
Helen Purperhart
Yoga is not just for adults but a great activity to use with children between lessons, during a gym class, or after school. Giving children a few minutes to relax, breathe, and stretch can rejuvenate them and get them ready to learn. Yoga also encourages coordination, flexibility, strength, and relaxation. The Yoga Adventure for Children contains 82 different activities, including warm-up exercises, yoga postures, breathing exercises, concentration and meditation activities, visualization exercises, and wake-up exercises. Clear and concise written instructions and illustrations simplify the role of leading children in yoga exercises. Pick and choose which activities will work best for your students, and watch them have fun experiencing a healthy fitness activity. (130 pages)
© 2007
Print$14.95
Hunter House, Inc.
P.O. Box 2914
Alameda, CA 94501-0914
Phone: 510-865-5282
Fax: 510-865-4295
Web: http://www.hunterhouse.com

Thinking About Response to Intervention and Learning Disabilities: A Teacher's Guide (New)
Division for Learning Disabilities and Council for Exceptional Children
Response to Intervention (RTI) was introduced in the reauthorization of the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) in 2004 to be part of the process of identifying specific learning disabilities. This resource serves as a guide to help teachers and schools implement RtI effectively and positively. It is very user-friendly and includes information on what RtI is, why it was incorporated into the revision of IDEA, and how it is implemented in schools. The tiered approach is fully explained, as are the roles of the general educator and teachers. By providing the valuable information in a concise yet comprehensive format, this booklet can serve as a good resource for anyone who wants to learn more about RTI.
© 2007
Print$4.95
Division for Learning Disabilities
Council for Exceptional Children
1110 North Glebe Rd., Ste. 300
Arlington, VA 22201-5704
Phone: 888-232-7733
Fax: 703-264-9494
Web: http://www.teachingld.org

Tough to Reach, Tough to Teach: Students With Behavior Problems, Second Edition (New)
Sylvia Rockwell
This book is designed for teachers who work with disruptive students. Vignettes are provided to illustrate various classroom challenges such as profanity, fighting, tantrums, and resistance with a goal of helping teachers teach students better ways to communicate. An appendix with forms, games, and other instructional materials is also included. (203 pages)
© 2006
Print$27.95
Council for Exceptional Children
1110 N. Glebe Rd., Ste. 300
Arlington, VA 22201-5704
Phone: 703-620-3660
Fax: 703-264-9494
Web: http://www.cec.sped.org

Understanding Youth: Adolescent Development for Educators (New)
Michael J. Nakkula and Eric Toshalis
This book looks at how social class, the media, gender norms, peers, and other influences help adolescents form a sense of self and shape their future aspirations. The authors have taken research and theory in adolescent development and tied it to case studies that have meaningful use for anyone teaching or working with adolescents. (304 pages)
© 2006
Print$29.95
Harvard Education Publishing Group
8 Story St., 1st Floor
Cambridge, MA 02138
Phone: 888-437-1437
Fax: 978-348-1233
Web: http://www.hepg.org

Using NCLB Funds to Support Extended Learning Time: Opportunities for Afterschool Programs (New)
Ayeola Fortune, Heather Clapp Padgette, and Lucinda Fickel
The No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) includes a section that provides federal funding solely for afterschool programs called the 21st Century Community Learning Centers program. There are, however, several other funding streams in NCLB that can support extended learning opportunities as well. The purpose of this brief is to describe each of these funding streams and to discuss how they could be used to benefit and support afterschool programs. The brief provides a brief introduction to NCLB, followed by sections explaining the funding streams, which include Title I, School Improvement, Supplemental Educational Services, Comprehensive School Reform, Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities, and Innovative Programs. Tips for accessing these funds are also included. (32 pages)
© 2005
Print$20.00
Web Resourcehttp://www.financeproject.org/publications/usingnclbfunds.pdf
The Finance Project
1401 New York Ave. NW, Ste. 800
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-628-4200
Fax: 202-628-1293
E-mail: info@financeproject.org
Web: http://www.financeproject.org

Using Research and Reason in Education: How Teachers Can Use Scientifically Based Research to Make Curricular and Instructional Decisions
Paula J. Stanovich and Keith E. Stanovich
This publication discusses three ways schools and teachers can provide evidence about the effectiveness of their instructional methods. Student achievement can be demonstrated by formal testing implemented by the teacher, school district, or state; by published findings of research-based evidence; and through proof of reason-based practice that builds on the research evidence. Each method has advantages and disadvantages. The authors encourage teachers to become more skilled independent evaluators of educational research. (42 pages)
© 2003
PrintNo Charge
Web Resourcehttp://www.sde.state.ok.us/Programs/ReadingFirst/resources/Stanovich_Color.pdf
National Institute for Literacy
ED Pubs
P.O. Box 1398
Jessup, MD 20794-1398
Phone: 800-228-8813
Web: http://www.nifl.gov/archive/pfr/about.html

Using TANF to Finance Out-of-School Time Initiatives (New)
Nanette Relave and Margaret Flynn-Khan
This report provides information on using Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) funding for afterschool initiatives in light of the recent reauthorization of the TANF program. TANF purposes, requirements, eligibility, and funding opportunities are discussed. Understanding TANF funding opportunities can help policymakers use this resource most effectively for afterschool initiatives. (17 pages)
© 2007
Print$20.00
Web Resourcehttp://www.financeproject.org/publications/TANFtoFinanceOST.pdf
The Finance Project
1401 New York Ave. NW, Ste. 800
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-628-4200
Fax: 202-628-1293
E-mail: info@financeproject.org
Web: http://www.financeproject.org

Well-Managed Classroom, Second Edition (New)
Michele Hensley, Walter Powell, Susan Lamke, and Scott Hartman
Having a well-managed classroom includes building a sense of community, cooperation, and care. This book provides an overview of the components of the Girls and Boys Town Education Model, a school-based intervention strategy. The model, which is rooted in applied behavior analysis and social learning theory, emphasizes behavior management techniques, relationship-building techniques, and social skills instruction. Meant to serve as a resource in improving classroom management, this book offers information on connecting with your students, increasing opportunities for student success, addressing students' behaviors, and communicating with stakeholders. By promoting the idea of "school as community," these practices and strategies aim to motivate students by helping them feel good about the classroom environment and the relationships they have within that classroom. (231 pages)
© 2007
Print$24.95
Boys Town Press
14100 Crawford St.
Boys Town, NE 68010
Phone: 800-282-6657
Fax: 402-498-1310
Web: http://www.boystownpress.org

What Do Kids Need to Succeed? (New)
Search Institute
What do children need to succeed in life? The Search Institute emphasizes 40 concrete positive experiences and qualities that are crucial to young people's lives. These assets can enable adolescents to become responsible adults. External assets (support, empowerment, boundaries, and constructive use of time), internal assets (commitment to learning, positive values, social competencies, and positive identity), and their subcategories are described in this resource, which is available in both English and Spanish.
© 2007
Web Resourcehttp://www.search-institute.org/system/files/SearchInstituteBrochure.pdf
Search Institute
The Banks Building
615 First Ave. NE, Ste. 125
Minneapolis, MN 55413
Phone: 800-888-7828
Web: http://www.search-institute.org

What Do You Stand For? For Teens: A Guide to Building Character
Barbara A. Lewis
The purpose of this book is to help students ages 11 and older understand themselves better, figure out what they stand for, and develop positive character traits. Sample character traits include loyalty, peacefulness, citizenship, cleanliness, honesty, and integrity. Quotations on these traits offer words of wisdom. The author presents dilemmas in each chapter to challenge students' thinking about the character traits and to sharpen their problem-solving and decision-making skills. Activities offer fun and interesting ways to explore, experience, and strengthen positive character traits. True stories profile real kids who serve as examples for that particular trait. In addition, each chapter contains a section that lists Web sites, videos, books, and other resources. Posters, stickers, and buttons also are available. (277 pages)
© 2005
Print$18.95
Poster$9.95
Stickers$5.95
Character Buttons$14.95
Free Spirit Publishing
217 Fifth Ave. N, Ste. 200
Minneapolis, MN 55401-1724
Phone: 612-338-2068
Fax: 612-337-5050
E-mail: help4kids@freespirit.com
Web: http://www.freespirit.com

Written Communications That Inform and Influence (New)
Harvard Business School Press
This guide serves managers and leaders who wish to strengthen their written communication skills. Topics include tone, style, and rules of influential writing. Chapters include "Communication as a Change Tool" and "When One Style Does Not Fit All." Afterschool program directors compose correspondence ranging in difficulty and importance, from introductory e-mails to complex grant proposals. Written Communications provides guidelines for these and everything in between. Learn to craft proposals under deadlines, organize the written piece, use persuasive and appropriate style, and avoid common grammatical errors. (175 pages)
© 2006
Print$14.95
Harvard Business School Press
60 Harvard Way
Boston, MA 02163
Web: http://www.hbspress.org

Yardsticks: Children in the Classroom Ages 4–14, Third Edition (New)
Chip Wood
This book, written for both parents and educators, provides general indicators, or "yardsticks," of typical development for children ages 4–14. It describes the developmental traits of each age and includes charts that summarize common physical, social, language, and cognitive growth patterns. This very practical guide can help parents and teachers understand and support children's growth and learning. Knowing children's developmental needs can help parents and teachers ensure that the activities and curriculum they are using are age appropriate. (240 pages)
© 2007
Print$18.00
Northeast Foundation for Children, Inc.
85 Ave. A, Ste. 204
P.O. Box 718
Turners Falls, MA 01376-0718
Phone: 800-360-6332
Fax: 877-206-3952
Web: http://www.responsiveclassroom.org


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