Afterschool

Briefs and Reports

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SEDL Insights, Vol. 2, No. 1: Building Supportive Relationships in Afterschool (2014)

Afterschool programs can help students develop knowledge to enhance academic success while also providing them with opportunities to develop social and problem-solving skills. In our work with afterschool programs, we have seen that positive relationships with school-day personnel, families, community members, and between and among program staff and students help these programs thrive. This issue of SEDL Insights explores how afterschool practitioners can build strong relationships that benefit all stakeholders.

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The National Partnership for Quality Afterschool Learning Randomized Controlled Trial Studies of Promising Afterschool Programs: Summary of Findings (2009)
SEDL provided analytic and technical support to three large-scale randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effect of promising literacy curricula in afterschool settings on student academic achievement. This research brief, the last in a three-part series, presents an overview of the studies and a summary of the implementation and findings across the 2 years of funding.
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Implementing Randomized Controlled Trial Studies in Afterschool Settings: The State of the Field (2008)
SEDL provided analytic and technical support to three large-scale randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effect of a promising literacy curriculum in afterschool settings on student academic achievement. This research brief is the first in a series intended to provide the field with insights culled from this collaborative effort.
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Key Issues and Strategies for Recruitment and Implementation in Large-Scale Randomized Controlled Trial Studies in Afterschool Settings (2008)
SEDL provided analytic and technical support to three large-scale randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effect of promising literacy curricula in afterschool settings on student academic achievement. This research brief is the second in a series intended to address some of the key challenges faced during the studies to provide insights to the research and practice community.
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Shared Features of High-Performing After-School Programs: A Follow-Up to the TASC Evaluation (2005)
This study examined high-performing after-school projects funded by The After-School Corporation (TASC), to determine what characteristics, if any, these projects shared. Evaluators reanalyzed student performance data collected during the multiyear evaluation of the TASC initiative to identify projects where the TASC afterschool program was especially likely to have contributed to improvements in studentsÕ academic achievement.