Texas Comprehensive Center

Previous Work
October 2005 through September 2012

These resources were published under a previous TXCC funding; therefore, information contained therein may have changed and is not updated.

English Language Learners Materials

What Can a Mathematics Teacher Do for the English Language Learner?


Academic Language

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Description

  • Teachers of ELLs in mathematics should identify and explicitly teach high-frequency words that will be used in many different mathematics classes.
  • Limit introduction of new vocabulary words to 10 for any one lesson
  • Have a reduced list of key words that occur in both conversational and academic language. The words often have multiple meanings and require specific interpretation in the context of mathematics.
  • Academic language should not be overly simplified
    • use synonyms
    • rely less on verbal explanations; use more diagrams, paper models, graphs, etc.

(Adapted from Texas Education Agency, 1999.)

Example (Engage, Explore, Explain)

Note: These examples reflect words that occur across multiple math courses, rather than those that are course-specific.

 

 

Equation
Combine
Factor
Figure
Algorithm
Parallelogram
Rotation
Integers
Function
Square
Relations
Trend line
Logarithm
Reflection
Mode

Positive
Sum
Even (number)
Extension
Mean
Decagon
Hexagon
Variable
Isometric
Range
Slope
Regression
Theorem
Dilation
Compound

Negative
Square root
Odd (number)
Plot
Bisector
Quadrilateral
Square units
Liter
Base
Domain
Intercept
Exponential
Matrix
Proportional
Composite

Table
Difference
Estimate
Field
Multiples
Exponent
Hypotenuse
Systems
Net
Independent
Intersection
Line
Transformation
Mean
Properties

Add
Column
Pattern
Divide
Coordinates
Probability
Translation
Volume
Roots
Dependent
Scatter plot
Quadratic
Axis
Median
Vector

 



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