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National Partnership for Quality Afterschool Learning
A Resource Guide for Planning and Operating Afterschool Programs
Information

Evaluation

This section includes 20 resources on school accountability and afterschool program outcomes. information on methods of evaluation, data-collection procedures, standards, and testing is provided.

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Afterschool Initiative: Evaluation (New)
Sabrina Arrendondo Mattson
This resource presents the program evaluation findings of the Colorado Trust's 5-year, $11-million afterschool initiative. This initiative began in 2000, provided support to more than 30 afterschool providers in Colorado, and served more than 12,000 students in grades 4–9. The National Research Center conducted the independent program evaluation and found that the participating youth reported improvements in their positive life choices, sense of self, core values, cultural competency, life skills, community involvement, and academic success. Chapters on the program evaluation methodology, results, conclusions, and recommendations are included. (48 pages)
© 2005
Web Resourcehttp://www.coloradotrust.org/repository/publications/pdfs/ASI/ASI-EvalAssessmentreport9-05.pdf
The Colorado Trust
1600 Sherman St.
Denver, CO 80203
Phone: 888-847-9140
Fax: 303-839-9034
E-mail: receptionist@coloradotrust.org
Web: http://www.coloradotrust.org

Analyzing Qualitative Data
Ellen Taylor-Powell and Marcus Renner
This guide explores the many ways of examining narrative data, which is often referred to as content analysis. It describes the analysis process, which includes the following steps: getting to know the data, focusing on the analysis, categorizing the information, identifying patterns, and interpreting the data. The guide also discusses the pitfalls of the analysis process. (10 pages)
© 2002
Print$1.25
Web Resourcehttp://www.uwex.edu/ces/pdande/evaluation/evaldocs.html
Cooperative Extension Publications
University of Wisconsin
45 N. Charter St.
Madison, WI 53715
Phone: 877-947-7827

Analyzing Quantitative Data
Ellen Taylor-Powell
This resource discusses various types of descriptive statistics that can be used to make evaluation data more understandable. These statistics include numerical counts or frequencies, percentages, measures of central tendency (mean, mode, and median), and measures of variability (range, standard deviation, and variance). The guide offers specific examples of each of these descriptive statistics and explains how to calculate them. It also shows how to rank and work with the data to allow evaluators to explore their findings further. (11 pages)
© 1996
Print$2.00
Web Resourcehttp://www.uwex.edu/ces/pdande/evaluation/evaldocs.html
Cooperative Extension Publications
University of Wisconsin
45 N. Charter St.
Madison, WI 53715
Phone: 877-947-7827

Charting the Benefits of High-Quality After-School Program Experiences: Evidence From New Research on Improving After-School Opportunities for Disadvantaged Youth (New)
Elizabeth R. Reisner, Deborah Lowe Vandell, Ellen M. Pechman, Kim M. Pierce, B. Bradford Brown, and Daniel Bolt
This research focuses on improving afterschool programs and opportunities for youth. The paper examines the policy implications for recent findings from the Promising Program study, which explores how high-quality afterschool programs affect youth. Findings from the study suggest that plans for high-quality afterschool programming should span entire communities, uniting to engage the largest number of at-risk youth. Working alone, afterschool programs offer limited choices; therefore, youth look to other, sometimes less beneficial, settings for more desirable activities. The study finds that working together, afterschool programs can provide a wider array of opportunities for youth. Implications for policy planning are also included in this study. (16 pages)
© 2007
Web Resourcehttp://www.gse.uci.edu/docs/PASP%20Charting%20the%20Benefits.pdf
Policy Studies Associates, Inc.
1718 Connecticut Ave. NW, Ste. 400
Washington, DC 20009
Phone: 202-939-9780
Fax: 202-939-5732
Web: http://www.policystudies.com

Collecting Evaluation Data: An Overview of Sources and Methods
Ellen Taylor-Powell and Sara Steele
This resource provides a general overview of the types and methods of evaluation data available. It groups the most common sources of evaluative information into three categories: existing information, people and pictorial records, and observations. The guide also discusses methods for the collection of evaluation information, including surveys, case studies, interviews, observation, tests, logs, and document analysis, and it outlines various types of evaluation instruments. (11 pages)
© 1996
Print$2.00
Web Resourcehttp://www.uwex.edu/ces/pdande/evaluation/evaldocs.html
Cooperative Extension Publications
University of Wisconsin
45 N. Charter St.
Madison, WI 53715
Phone: 877-947-7827

Collecting Evaluation Data: Direct Observation
Ellen Taylor-Powell and Sara Steele
This publication discusses direct observation as a method of collecting evaluation data. The authors highlight situations when direct observation is useful, including when you want direct information or when you are trying to understand an ongoing behavior or process or unfolding event. The guide lists the program components that should be observed, including behavior, physical surroundings, and interactions, and it discusses what an evaluator should look for during observations and how to record what is observed. The publication also explores requirements and training methods for observers. The appendix includes examples of observation guides that are used to record information. (8 pages)
© 1996
Print$2.00
Web Resourcehttp://www.uwex.edu/ces/pdande/evaluation/evaldocs.html
Cooperative Extension Publications
University of Wisconsin
45 N. Charter St.
Madison, WI 53715
Phone: 877-947-7827

Collecting Evaluation Data: Surveys
Ellen Taylor-Powell and Carol Hermann
This guide offers an extensive overview of conducting surveys to collect evaluation data. It discusses the initial planning that needs to take place before administering a survey, the situations for which a survey is an appropriate evaluation tool, and the process of choosing the most appropriate survey method (e.g., mail surveys, telephone surveys, face-to-face surveys). It also discusses the planning that needs to take place before conducting a survey, the actual implementation of the survey, ways to ensure a good response to the survey, and the interpretation of survey results if the survey response is low. The appendix includes extensive references and samples of telephone survey materials, press releases, and other documents. (27 pages)
© 2000
Print$5.00
Web Resourcehttp://www.uwex.edu/ces/pdande/evaluation/evaldocs.html
Cooperative Extension Publications
University of Wisconsin
45 N. Charter St.
Madison, WI 53715
Phone: 877-947-7827

Documenting Progress and Demonstrating Results: Evaluating Local Out-of-School Time Programs
Priscilla Little, Sharon DuPree, and Sharon Deich
This brief provides afterschool practitioners with the techniques, tools, and strategies they need to improve their programs and track their effectiveness longitudinally. The authors also present information about many areas of evaluation so that programs can ultimately conduct self-evaluations. The guide is divided into four parts. Part 1 reviews the key issues for conducting a program evaluation, including the program's stage of development, the program's target population, and the information funders expect to glean from the evaluation. Part 2 looks at the elements of a logic model and explains how it can be a useful instrument in program design and evaluation. Part 3 examines the five-tiered approach to evaluation, which involves early planning, documentation of program services, clarification of the program's intent, modification of the program, and demonstration of program impact. Part 4 discusses how to creatively disseminate information about the evaluation to stakeholders. The appendix includes evaluation terminology and a review of common data-collection methods. (48 pages)
© 2002
Web Resourcehttp://www.financeprojectinfo.org/Publications/OSTlocalevaluation.pdf
The Finance Project
1401 New York Ave., Ste. 800
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-628-4200
Fax: 202-628-1293
E-mail: info@financeproject.org
Web: http://www.financeproject.org

Field Guide to Nonprofit Program Design, Marketing, and Evaluation, Fourth Edition (Revised)
Carter McNamara
This updated reference provides thorough, yet concise, guidelines for all critical aspects of a nonprofit program. It is written in an easy-to-implement style that includes 25 worksheets in an appendix and online. The highly practical resource can be used at any stage of development of the nonprofit program. For example, it can be used to conduct preparatory strategic planning, perform a market analysis, plan finances, develop credible fundraising proposals, and evaluate performance against goals and outcomes. (252 pages)
© 2006
Print$32.00
Authenticity Consulting
4008 Lake Drive Ave. North
Minneapolis, MN 55422-1508
Phone: 800-971-2250
Fax: 763-592-1661
Web: http://www.authenticityconsulting.com

Measuring Youth Program Quality: A Guide to Assessment Tools (New)
Nicole Yohalem and Alicia Wilson-Ahlstrom with Sean Fischer and Marybeth Shinn
Quality assessment tools for afterschool programs are important for policymakers wanting to make sure funds are allocated to programs likely to have an impact and succeed. Assessment tools are also important at the practice level because they help practitioners mark what effective practices look like and allow them to assess and improve on their programs. This guide was designed to compare the purpose, structure, content, and technical properties of several youth program quality assessment tools. This resource provides useful guidance to practitioners, policymakers, researchers, and evaluators on what tools are available and under what conditions they would be most appropriate. (83 pages)
© 2007
Web Resourcehttp://www.forumfyi.org/files/Measuring_Youth_Program_Quality.pdf
The Forum for Youth Investment
7064 Eastern Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20011
Phone: 202-207-3333
Fax: 202-207-3329
Web: http://www.forumfyi.org

Out-of-School Time Evaluation Snapshot: Measurement Tools for Evaluating Out-of-School Time Programs: An Evaluation Resource (New)
Christopher Wilmer, Suzanne Bouffard, and Priscilla Little
This resource describes the academic, youth development, and prevention performance measures currently being used by out-of-school time programs to assess their progress and demonstrate results. It lists data sources for these measures and provides bibliographic citations, Internet links, and sample items from the different instruments. Practitioners can use this resource to help find an evaluation instrument that matches their program and needs. (29 pages)
© 2006
Web Resourcehttp://www.hfrp.org/publications-resources/publications-series/out-of-school-time-evaluation-snapshots/measurement-tools-for-evaluating-out-of-school-time-programs-an-evaluation-resource
Harvard Family Research Project
Harvard Graduate School of Education
3 Garden St.
Cambridge, MA 02138
Phone: 617-495-9108
Fax: 617-495-8594
E-mail: hfrp@gse.harvard.edu
Web: http://www.hfrp.org

Planning a Program Evaluation and Planning a Program Evaluation Worksheet
Ellen Taylor-Powell, Sara Steele, and Mohammad Douglah
This guide, organized into four major sections, helps groups plan program evaluations. The first section covers topics such as the purpose, target audience, and need for the evaluation. The second section discusses sources of information and data-collection methods. The third section addresses how the data will be analyzed, interpreted, and communicated to others. The final section examines time lines, the division of responsibilities, and budgets. Each section presents a series of questions and considerations for you to adapt to your own program needs and situations. The four-page worksheet describes each of the major sections of the guide and enables you to complete the information as it relates to your particular program evaluation. (31 pages)
© 1996
Guide$2.00
Worksheet$1.00
Web Resourcehttp://www.uwex.edu/ces/pdande/evaluation/evaldocs.html
Cooperative Extension Publications
University of Wisconsin
45 N. Charter St.
Madison, WI 53715
Phone: 877-947-7827

Program Evaluation: Forms and Approaches, Third Edition (New)
John M. Owen
This resource provides recent research on evaluation and includes timely examples from worldwide sources. The text provides a comprehensive and useful overview of the evaluation process in a variety of settings, including the educational setting. The comparisons offer help in choosing and tailoring the appropriate techniques for any program. In addition, the book describes and presents examples based on the five major forms of evaluative inquiry: proactive, clarificative, interactive, monitoring, and impact. This edition includes a chapter on evaluation management and additional sections discussing negotiation theory, evidence-based practice, performance auditing and management, and realistic evaluation. (298 pages)
© 2007
Print$38.00
The Guilford Press
72 Spring St.
New York, NY 10012
Phone: 800-365-7006
Web: http://www.guilford.com

Questionnaire Design: Asking Questions With a Purpose
Ellen Taylor-Powell
This resource assists in constructing an evaluation questionnaire and in completing an analysis of the type of data you want to collect from your questionnaire. In doing this, it examines knowledge, beliefs, attitudes, opinions, behaviors, and attributes. The publication offers advice on how to word questions and discusses the most effective questions to elicit the responses and data you need. The guide also shows how to most appropriately format and pretest a questionnaire. The appendix provides additional information on how to request attribute information (age, income, etc.). (20 pages)
© 1998
Print$3.00
Web Resourcehttp://www.uwex.edu/ces/pdande/evaluation/evaldocs.html
Cooperative Extension Publications
University of Wisconsin
45 N. Charter St.
Madison, WI 53715
Phone: 877-947-7827

Sampling
Ellen Taylor-Powell
This evaluation resource provides guidance on conducting sampling. It first addresses whether sampling is an appropriate evaluation tool for a particular program. Then it presents sampling for generalizability, or probability sampling, and talks about specific sampling strategies, including simple random sampling, systematic sampling, and stratified sampling. The resource also explores sampling for other purposes, or non-probability sampling, including quota sampling and purposeful sampling. The appendixes list references, a table of random numbers, and recommended sample sizes. (12 pages)
© 1998
Print$2.00
Web Resourcehttp://www.uwex.edu/ces/pdande/evaluation/evaldocs.html
Cooperative Extension Publications
University of Wisconsin
45 N. Charter St.
Madison, WI 53715
Phone: 877-947-7827

Selected Evaluation Terms
Priscilla Little
Evaluation terminology can be confusing at times. This resource provides commonly accepted definitions for terms used in the out-of-school-time field. It also discusses the difference between performance measurement and program evaluation, the difference between quantitative and qualitative data, and the main features and tradeoffs in study-design choices. (5 pages)
© 2002
Web Resourcehttp://www.hfrp.org/publications-resources/browse-our-publications/selected-evaluation-terms
Harvard Family Research Project
Harvard Graduate School of Education
3 Garden St.
Cambridge, MA 02138
Phone: 617-495-9108
Fax: 617-495-8594
E-mail: hfrp@gse.harvard.edu
Web: http://www.hfrp.org

Successful Program Evaluation (New)
Michael K. Wells
Successful Program Evaluation is designed to help grant writers create strong evaluation sections of proposals that may make the difference between getting funded or not. Helpful information is provided on topics such as what funders want, developing an evaluation plan, writing the evaluation section, and evaluation instruments. In addition, a chapter on resources and a comprehensive glossary are included. A well-developed and well-written program evaluation can strengthen an entire grant proposal. With this book, grant writers will have the tools necessary to take their grant development strategies to the next level. (142 pages)
© 2007
Print$29.95
Portland State University
School of Extended Studies
Continuing Education Press
P.O. Box 1394
Portland, OR 97207-1394
Phone: 866-647-7377
Fax: 503-725-4715
Web: http://www.cep.pdx.edu/titles/program_evaluation

The ABCs of Evaluation: Timeless Techniques for Program and Project Managers, Second Edition (Revised)
John Boulmetis and Phyllis Dutwin
This updated resource shows how to select participants for an evaluation and how to deal with multiple goals and objectives, including those of an organization, its staff, and the client. The book describes different evaluation models, illustrates the circumstances under which each model can be used, and offers tips on identifying data sources and collecting data. Charts, graphs, models, and lists throughout the book help organize, extend, and facilitate the understanding of each evaluation concept. The authors, both professional educators and trainers, untangle the complexity of the evaluation process in a practical, accessible guide. (239 pages)
© 2006
Print$40.00
Jossey-Bass
989 Market St.
San Francisco, CA 94103-1741
Phone: 800-956-7739
Fax: 415-433-0499
Web: http://www.josseybass.com

The Costs of Out-of-School-Time Programs: A Review of the Available Evidence (New)
Christianne Lind, Nanette Relave, Sharon Deich, Jean Grossman, and Andrew Gersick
Have you wondered about the cost of high-quality out-of-school-time programs or the cost of improving an existing program? This resource reviews the literature on this topic and provides key findings on various costs (startup, operating, capital, and infrastructure or system-building). Cost data from out-of-school-time program studies is included as well as a bibliography of resources on costs and quality. (28 pages)
© 2006
Web Resourcehttp://www.financeproject.org/publications/litreview.pdf
The Finance Project
1401 New York Ave. NW, Ste. 800
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-628-4200
Fax: 202-628-1293
E-mail: info@financeproject.org
Web: http://www.financeproject.org

Using Research and Reason in Education: How Teachers Can Use Scientifically Based Research to Make Curricular and Instructional Decisions
Paula J. Stanovich and Keith E. Stanovich
This publication discusses three ways schools and teachers can provide evidence about the effectiveness of their instructional methods. Student achievement can be demonstrated by formal testing implemented by the teacher, school district, or state; by published findings of research-based evidence; and through proof of reason-based practice that builds on the research evidence. Each method has advantages and disadvantages. The authors encourage teachers to become more skilled independent evaluators of educational research. (42 pages)
© 2003
PrintNo Charge
Web Resourcehttp://www.sde.state.ok.us/Programs/ReadingFirst/resources/Stanovich_Color.pdf
National Institute for Literacy
ED Pubs
P.O. Box 1398
Jessup, MD 20794-1398
Phone: 800-228-8813
Web: http://www.nifl.gov/archive/pfr/about.html


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